• Before reporting problems with your board running Armbian, check the following:

    • 1. Check power supply, check SD card and check other people experiences

      Power supply issues are one of the three biggest issues you'll face when starting with Single Board Computers (SBCs). SD card issues, whether fake or faulty, are another and issues resulting from poor board design is the other common issues you can encounter.   Power supply issues can be tricky. You might have a noisy power supply that works with one board because it has extra filtering, but won't work with another. Or you're using that cheap phone charger because your board has a microUSB connector, and it is either erratic, or doesn't start up, or even becomes the cause of some SD card issues.    Some tips to avoid the most common causes of problems reported:   Don't power via micro USB  - unless you have optimised your setup for low power requirements. Micro USB is great for mobile phones because they are simply charging a battery. It's bad for SBCs. Yes, it does work for a lot of people, but it also causes more problems and headaches over time than it is worth, unless you know exactly what you are doing. If you have a barrel jack power connector on your SBC, use it instead! If there is an option for powering via header connections, use that option!
        Don't use mobile phone chargers. They might be convenient and cheap, but this is because they are meant for charging phones, not powering your SBC which has particular power requirements.
        When you are evaluating a power supply, make sure you run some stress tests on your system to ensure that it will not cause issues down the path.   (Micro) SD card issues can be sneaky. They might appear right at the start causing strange boot and login errors, or they might cause problems over time. It is best to run a test on any new SD card you use, to ensure that it really is what it is, and to ensure that isn't faulty. Armbian provides you a simple way to do this   --   armbianmonitor -c /path/to/device/to/test  

    • 2. Make sure to collect and provide all necessary information

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      Before you post a question, use the forum search as someone else might have already had the same problem and resolved it. And make sure you've read the Armbian documentation. If you still haven't found an answer, make sure you include the following in your post:   1. Logs when you can boot the board: armbianmonitor -u (paste URL to your forum post)   2. If your board does not boot, provide a log from serial console or at least make a picture, where it stops.   3. Describe the problem the best you can and provide all necessary info that we can reproduce the problem. We are not clairvoyant or mind readers. Please describe your setup as best as possible so we know what your operating environment is like.     We will not help in cases you are not using stable official Armbian builds, you have a problem with 3rd party hardware or reported problem would not be able to reproduced.

OT: OrangePi Zero connector case mod
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10 posts in this topic

I need to attach some devices via spi and i2c to an orange pi zero but would like to keep it in its original case.
Just soldering a few wires to the gpio pins and drilling a hole in the case isn't really an option. I am looking for
a nice and clean way.  Browsing through AliExpress looking for connectors has not revealed any suitable options
so far. I already thought about adding an 2.54mm 2x26 Pin Male Double Row Right Angle Pin Header and
cut a suitable hole to the case but I guess it would protrude too much.

Which connector do you recommend? It should have at least 4 contacts.

Has anyone modified the case and added some small connectors? Photos?

Looking for your suggestions
 

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What's about a 3d printed case? Something like this or this? Cause OPi 0 runs often into overheating I'm not sure if it is a good idea. Maybe I'll print one for my self and test how it works..

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Well, I have the original case with the expansion module.

If I had a printer I wouldn't have asked :-)

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Don't know where you're come from but there are so many print services arround the world. So send the stl files and get your case for arround 10$. ABS looks often ugly if you drill holes into it (did this once for a RPi case).  Going out through near to the USB from the expansionboard isn't an option? If you're sure that you never use more cables on it just solder the wires directly on your board without any pinheader. 

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4 hours ago, data said:

Which still leaves my questions unanswered...

which one?

14 hours ago, data said:

Which connector do you recommend?

 

13 hours ago, chwe said:

If you're sure that you never use more cables on it just solder the wires directly on your board without any pinheader. 

The more connectors, the more possibilities for errors. If this is a fixed system, why using connectors?

 

14 hours ago, data said:

Looking for your suggestions

 

13 hours ago, chwe said:

Going out through near to the USB from the expansionboard isn't an option?

 

If I see it right on the pictures the expansion board does not overlay the 26 pinheader.  There are two possibilities, bent or not bent pinheader (bent is for sure more expensive, cause for the linear you can use two rows of 13 pins). Male or female connector (does not really make a difference, as long as you don't stack your own expansion board directly to the opi).  

Going out of your case depends on your needs (e.g. on which side of your case do you need the wires, should it look "perfect" or just work).  Quick and dirty solution: If you don't use the 3.5mm jack from the expansionboard, just cut it out and you have your hole or melt a hole with your soldering iron  into the case (ABS is a thermoplast so melting would be the easiest way). 

If you want the nice perfect solution, download a CAD, design the perfect case for your needs bring this to a printservice and you're happy to have a nice case.:).

 

This is mostly a software related forum and all the support is for free. You get some hints (e.g. about ABS), IMHO it's time that you start to think about your needs.  Seems that nobody who have the OPi 0 case used the pinheader or they don't saw your topic. 

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I used the case yesterday with a v1.1 PCB OPi zero for testing. It was just running "aplay" looping though some songs (strictly less than %5 CPU load). The test started at 46 C and reached 65 C in 10 minutes (full power limit). And 5 minutes after that I had a full system failure and it did not start again (I'll look into it when I have time). So I threw the case away.

 

In this current status the box is not usable without active cooling. As the expansion board covers the SOC a fan on the top does nothing and the sides are also not an option. One side is covered by the expansion board's header and I wanted to spare the other side for I/O as you will do - and that would require a ribbon cable which also should prevent airflow. 

 

I asked for an alternative design in their forums but I think a 3D-printed case designed for you application is the only viable option as @chwe suggests.

 

Edited by bozden
typo
chwe likes this

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2 hours ago, bozden said:

I used the case yesterday with a v1.1 PCB OPi zero for testing. It was just running "aplay" looping though some songs (strictly less than %5 CPU load). The test started at 46 C and reached 65 C in 10 minutes (full power limit). And 5 minutes after that I had a full system failure and it did not start again

Hmm, interessting. I thought the rev. v1.4 board is the troublemaker in terms of overheating. Could you repeat this experiment with your v1.4 board? I plan to do some thermal stresstests with the board as soon as my second one arrives (with current&voltage measurement on different spots on the board). 

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@chwe

I can do that on Wednesday. But what do you expect? When the old version crashed there was a nice odor of electronics (I'm not sure if the board is OK yet).

 

But my point is: It is the OPi Zero case that causes the problem, as there is no airflow design.

 

Without the case it ripples around 55-56 C with "aplay" running.

 

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More or less, just cause i'm interessted if it gets worser or not. If it would be that unstable I'll make a new case for the OPi0 with active cooling possibilities.

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