• Before reporting problems with your board running Armbian, check the following:

    • 1. Check power supply, check SD card and check other people experiences   06/23/17

      Power supply issues are one of the three biggest issues you'll face when starting with Single Board Computers (SBCs). SD card issues, whether fake or faulty, are another and issues resulting from poor board design is the other common issues you can encounter.   Power supply issues can be tricky. You might have a noisy power supply that works with one board because it has extra filtering, but won't work with another. Or you're using that cheap phone charger because your board has a microUSB connector, and it is either erratic, or doesn't start up, or even becomes the cause of some SD card issues.    Some tips to avoid the most common causes of problems reported:   Don't power via micro USB  - unless you have optimised your setup for low power requirements. Micro USB is great for mobile phones because they are simply charging a battery. It's bad for SBCs. Yes, it does work for a lot of people, but it also causes more problems and headaches over time than it is worth, unless you know exactly what you are doing. If you have a barrel jack power connector on your SBC, use it instead! If there is an option for powering via header connections, use that option!
        Don't use mobile phone chargers. They might be convenient and cheap, but this is because they are meant for charging phones, not powering your SBC which has particular power requirements.
        When you are evaluating a power supply, make sure you run some stress tests on your system to ensure that it will not cause issues down the path.   (Micro) SD card issues can be sneaky. They might appear right at the start causing strange boot and login errors, or they might cause problems over time. It is best to run a test on any new SD card you use, to ensure that it really is what it is, and to ensure that isn't faulty. Armbian provides you a simple way to do this   --   armbianmonitor -c /path/to/device/to/test  
    • 2. Make sure to collect and provide all necessary information   06/24/17

      We can only help if you provide quality information for us to work with. All stable images from the download section are tested, most stable upgrades are tested and we have tens of thousands of users. Even with regular and extensive testings, bugs sometimes do slip through. This is a voluntary support service and is unrelated to board makers, and is not obligated to provide you any answers. Repeated asking the same questions because you're not happy with the answers will result in you being ignored.

      Before you post a question, use the forum search as someone else might have already had the same problem and resolved it. And make sure you've read the Armbian documentation. If you still haven't found an answer, make sure you include the following in your post:   1. Logs when you can boot the board: armbianmonitor -u (paste URL to your forum post)   2. If your board does not boot, provide a log from serial console or at least make a picture, where it stops.   3. Describe the problem the best you can and provide all necessary info that we can reproduce the problem. We are not clairvoyant or mind readers. Please describe your setup as best as possible so we know what your operating environment is like.     We will not help in cases you are not using stable official Armbian builds, you have a problem with 3rd party hardware or reported problem would not be able to reproduced.

[Tutorial] Orange Pi H3 -- fix thermal/stability problems
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EDIT: Please be aware that it seems voltage switching on the various Orange Pi One boards seems to have some tolerances. A user reported his Orange Pi One crashes randomly when staying on the lower voltage with the new fex settings so unless it's confirmed which voltages are really used or how to measure the real voltage the proposed fix here might lead to undervoltage/stability issues on some boards.

 

EDIT 2: In the meantime it seems only my board suffers from overvoltage so v0.3 of fix-thermal-problems.sh will apply default settings for Orange Pi One/Lite again.

 

When we first started with Orange Pi H3 SBCs a few months ago we had to realise that the SoC was blamed for overheating. Fortunately this was mostly due to overvolting/overclocking. I developed a rather primitive script to fix this stuff by converting script.bin to a temporary file, adjusting the relevant parameters to sane values and converting this back to script.bin last year.

 

Now Orange Pi One is there and the manufacturer simply disappeared. They sell a new board but there's zero information, OS images, any comments on settings, no schematic, simply nothing. This intercultural thing is still really amazing! :)

 

EDIT: Schematics have been released: http://linux-sunxi.org/Orange_Pi_One#See_also

 

First investigations showed that the different way to regulate the SoC's voltage seems somewhat broken and Orange Pi One is overvolted by design (affects temperature, stability and probably longevity negatively)

 

Since most Orange Pi One users cluelessly use OS images for Orange Pi PC and have not the slightest idea what's going on I fixed the fix-thermal-problems.sh script to differentiate between the older Orange Pis and the new Orange Pi One. The script checks the amount of available DRAM and if it's 512MB then it applies sane settings for Orange Pi One (no voltage switching since this is dangerous -- see above).

 

Anyone here with access to Orange Pi forums (me not -- I lost my logon credentials the 2nd time and this crappy forum doesn't send out password reset links!) should inform the users there that they should take care and that fix-thermal-problems.sh now is also able to cure Orange Pi One. Please spread the word and link to this thread.

 

1st note: Since most users have not the slightest idea what's going on on their SBC I tried to simplify installation of a small lightweight monitoring solution. If anyone wants to be able to simply monitor what's going on on his Orange Pi: In case a Debian based distro is used it's easier than anytime before: http://forum.armbian.com/index.php/topic/617-wip-support-for-the-upcoming-orange-pi-one/?p=5317

 

2nd note (mostly to the other Armbian devs): I also want to collect some feedback on this 'adjust script.bin on the fly' approach since the h3disp utility we develop should be able to run not only on Armbian but on most of the images currently used with any Orange Pi model. We try to improve and not to force someone to use a specific distro/image :)

aegrotatio likes this

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Thanks so much for this! May I ask why "no voltage switching since this is dangerous" is struck out? Is the under/overvoltage issue actually resolved? Wouldn't the voltage still swing up to ~1.5V, like you previous reported? IIRC, your review of the One suggests staying out of the device though.

 

Also, I believe the orangepi.org forum does send out reset emails, except that the Great Firewall blocks emails going out to GMail, etc. You might need QQ to ensure mails going through.

 

I'm still waiting for my new account to be verified - just need one more day of daily login for that.

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The "orangepi.org" forum is terribly slow sometime, and even some pages appeared incomplete.

My account never been confirmed after several months. Their emails are either never sent or, as you said, maybe blocked.

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The "orangepi.org" forum is terribly slow sometime, and even some pages appeared incomplete.

My account never been confirmed after several months. Their emails are either never sent or, as you said, maybe blocked.

 

I believe you'll need to log in for 3 consecutive days for it to be automatically verified.

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May I ask why "no voltage switching since this is dangerous" is struck out?

 

My 1st assumption was that Orange Pi One switches between 1.3V and 1.5V and therefore decided to create settings that always remain on the lower voltage. While this worked with my Orange Pi One (that is obviously different or maybe damaged) this is not true for OPi One in general: People confirmed that switching between 1.1V and 1.3V happens so my assumption is wrong (and maybe I damaged my OPi One myself since I realised pretty late that the GPIO header is rotated and I tried several times to insert DC-IN where it shouldn't be inserted to)

 

Apart from this the OPi One works like a charm but since for $5 more you get a device with few more available ports and a better voltage regulation I would buy the PC in most cases (and to be honest: ATM I would buy neither PC nor One since I want to see full specs of the announced 'Orange Pi PC Plus' first -- regarding the naming scheme I still wonder what they smoke over there at Xunlong)

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