With this commit I added 7-zip benchmark reporting to Armbian now. Will be available after next updates and with next batch of new images.   Why not recommending to just do an 'apt install p7zip ; 7zr b'? Since 'fire and forget' benchmarking is always BS. You need some monitoring in parallel to know whether your system was really idle and at which clockspeeds the CPU cores were operating (throttling occuring or not?).    Most recent 7-zip contains an own routine to 'pre-heat' the system prior to starting the benchmark (to let cpufreq scaling switch from low clockspeeds to highest ones and e.g. on Intel systems let the system enter TurboBoost modes). This 7-zip code runs single threaded so based on the kernel's scheduler sometimes ending up on the 'wrong' CPU core (e.g. a little core on big.LITTLE SoCs)   On a NanoPC T4 with conservative settings (limiting big CPU cores to 1.8 GHz and little cores to 1.4 GHz) this looks like this: root@nanopct4:/home/tk# armbianmonitor -z Preparing benchmark. Be patient please... 7-Zip (a) [64] 16.02 : Copyright (c) 1999-2016 Igor Pavlov : 2016-05-21 p7zip Version 16.02 (locale=en_US.UTF-8,Utf16=on,HugeFiles=on,64 bits,6 CPUs LE) LE CPU Freq: 1413 1414 1414 1411 1413 1414 1414 1414 1415 RAM size: 3878 MB, # CPU hardware threads: 6 RAM usage: 1323 MB, # Benchmark threads: 6 Compressing | Decompressing Dict Speed Usage R/U Rating | Speed Usage R/U Rating KiB/s % MIPS MIPS | KiB/s % MIPS MIPS 22: 3642 363 976 3543 | 98020 543 1540 8359 23: 3691 365 1030 3761 | 95217 541 1522 8239 24: 3606 354 1094 3878 | 92662 535 1520 8133 25: 4597 451 1164 5249 | 89079 529 1498 7928 ---------------------------------- | ------------------------------ Avr: 383 1066 4108 | 537 1520 8165 Tot: 460 1293 6136 Monitoring output recorded while running the benchmark: Time big.LITTLE load %cpu %sys %usr %nice %io %irq CPU C.St. 10:16:19: 1800/1416MHz 0.12 12% 1% 7% 2% 1% 0% 44.4°C 0/5 10:16:25: 408/ 600MHz 0.11 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 43.9°C 0/5 10:16:30: 600/1416MHz 0.10 1% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 45.0°C 0/5 10:16:35: 1800/1416MHz 0.17 40% 0% 39% 0% 0% 0% 49.4°C 0/5 10:16:40: 1800/1416MHz 0.32 77% 0% 77% 0% 0% 0% 55.0°C 0/5 10:16:45: 1800/1416MHz 0.94 73% 0% 72% 0% 0% 0% 51.1°C 0/5 10:16:50: 1800/1416MHz 0.94 65% 0% 65% 0% 0% 0% 53.3°C 0/5 10:16:55: 1800/1416MHz 1.19 68% 0% 67% 0% 0% 0% 56.1°C 0/5 10:17:00: 1800/1416MHz 1.49 79% 1% 78% 0% 0% 0% 53.9°C 0/5 10:17:06: 1800/1416MHz 1.45 31% 0% 31% 0% 0% 0% 57.8°C 0/5 10:17:11: 1800/1416MHz 2.07 68% 0% 67% 0% 0% 0% 57.2°C 0/5 10:17:17: 1800/1416MHz 2.30 78% 0% 77% 0% 0% 0% 58.9°C 0/5 10:17:22: 1800/1416MHz 2.52 90% 1% 89% 0% 0% 0% 57.8°C 0/5 10:17:27: 1800/1416MHz 2.72 81% 0% 80% 0% 0% 0% 57.2°C 0/5 Time big.LITTLE load %cpu %sys %usr %nice %io %irq CPU C.St. 10:17:32: 1800/1416MHz 2.66 61% 0% 60% 0% 0% 0% 60.6°C 0/5 We get an overall score of above 6100 and 7-zip's 'CPU Freq' line reports CPU0 (a little core) being clocked at 1.4 GHz. But since this is a big.LITTLE design we need the monitoring output that gets displayed below 7-zip benchmark numbers.   By looking at the 2nd line we see that the system was totally idle prior to starting the benchmark (I implemented a 10 second sleep between starting monitoring and firing up the benchmark for this reason -- to control whether the system was already busy or not). As a comparison 7-zip numbers of another RK3399 board that allowed the CPU cores to clock slightly higher (2.0/1.5 GHz): ODROID-N1 scored 6500.   As a reference some other boards.   Rock64 with new 1.4 GHz settings:     NanoPi NEO with cpufreq scaling limited to 816 MHz to keep the board always at lowest DVFS voltage (results irrelevant)   Please keep in mind that benchmarks that run fully multi threaded are NOT representative for most workloads running on computers (they're single threaded). Also please keep in mind that while 7-zip is not that much affected by different compiler settings (like the infamous sysbench) of course it is somewhat. So when you see 7-zip benchmark numbers generated few years ago when the 7z binary has been built with a GCC 4.x most probably with today's software and a binary built by GCC 7.x you see higher scores.   So take these comparison numbers with a grain of salt: https://s1.hoffart.de/7zip-bench/   To get new armbianmonitor with -z functionality today it's as easy as wget -O /usr/bin/armbianmonitor https://raw.githubusercontent.com/armbian/build/master/packages/bsp/common/usr/bin/armbianmonitor