FrankWizza

  • Posts

    2
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Everything posted by FrankWizza

  1. I got the kde community edition, and I would say that it came a long way. It is currently the way to go. Mobian is the most useful, the repos have everything, even if it doesn't work on mobile. Phosh on the other hand is pretty bad currently. They don't have auto screen rotation, and the prox sensor is always on, so the screen will shut off when you put your hand near it. Things with lomiri run the smoothest. Manjaro lomiri (under developed) and ubuntu touch (closer to android than linux). They are about to open orders again. I recommend getting the community edition, it comes with more ram, more storage, and a nice type c expansion dongle. Totally worth the price, but still needs a lot of work. All they really need to do is make a back cover that exposes the gpio. It has i2c, which can be used for a lot. I would also like to add an answer to one of your questions. You can access serial through the headphone jack. https://bloggerbust.ca/post/my-first-experience-connecting-to-the-phinephone-via-serial-console/
  2. Hello, I am having a bit of an issue. I have mapped my device (Bananapi M2Zero) into the 40pin template according to the schematics the provided here. https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B4PAo2nW2KfnMW5sVkxWSW9qa28/view I then copied it and pasted the contents of that file into the existing bananapim2.h file. After running setup.py install, my mapping.h file seems to match. Here is what I am using. /* * * This file is part of pyA20. * mapping.h is python GPIO extension. * * Copyright (c) 2014 Stefan Mavrodiev @ OLIMEX LTD, <support@olimex.com> * * pyA20 is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify * it under the terms of the GNU General Public License as published by * the Free Software Foundation; either version 2 of the License, or * (at your option) any later version. * * This program is distributed in the hope that it will be useful, * but WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY; without even the implied warranty of * MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. See the * GNU General Public License for more details. * * You should have received a copy of the GNU General Public License * along with this program; if not, write to the Free Software * Foundation, Inc., 51 Franklin Street, Fifth Floor, Boston, * MA 02110-1301, USA. * * mapping.h from: https://github.com/wdmomoxx/orangepi_ZERO_gpio_pyH2 * */ #ifndef __MAPPING_H #define __MAPPING_H #include "gpio_lib.h" /** Structure that describe all gpio */ typedef struct _pin { char name[10]; // The processor pin int offset; // Memory offset for the pin int pin_number; // Number on the connector }pin_t; typedef struct _gpio { char connector_name[10]; pin_t pins[41]; }gpio_t; gpio_t gpio[] = { /* Description of Pinheader, please don't change pinnumer to keep this library consistent! A 'RPi compatible' pin header (40pin) looks like the following: 3.3V |··| 5V GPIO2 |··| 5V GPIO3 |··| GND GPIO4 |··| GPIO14 GND |··| GPIO15 GPIO17 |··| GPIO18 GPIO27 |··| GND GPIO22 |··| GPIO23 3.3V |··| GPIO24 GPIO10 |··| GND GPIO9 |··| GPIO25 GPIO11 |··| GPIO8 GND |··| GPIO7 GPIO28* |··| GPIO29* GPIO5 |··| GND GPIO6 |··| GPIO12 GPIO13 |··| GND GPIO19 |··| GPIO16 GPIO26 |··| GPIO20 GND |··| GPIO21 (*) on the RPi those two pins are used for official HATS (read out eeprom), since this is never depoyed on SUNXI boards we can use this GPIOs too. ;) replace XZ with the pin which is wired out on this position (e.g. PA10, PG11 etc.) */ {"GPIO", { //'first row' { "GPIO2", SUNXI_GPA(12), 3 }, { "GPIO3", SUNXI_GPA(11), 5 }, { "GPIO4", SUNXI_GPA(6), 7 }, { "GPIO17", SUNXI_GPA(1), 11 }, { "GPIO27", SUNXI_GPA(0), 13 }, { "GPIO22", SUNXI_GPA(3), 15 }, { "GPIO10", SUNXI_GPC(0), 19 }, { "GPIO9", SUNXI_GPC(1), 21 }, { "GPIO11", SUNXI_GPC(2), 23 }, { "GPIO28", SUNXI_GPA(19), 27 }, { "GPIO5", SUNXI_GPA(7), 29 }, { "GPIO6", SUNXI_GPA(8), 31 }, { "GPIO13", SUNXI_GPA(9), 33 }, { "GPIO19", SUNXI_GPA(10), 35 }, { "GPIO26", SUNXI_GPA(17), 37 }, //'second row' { "GPIO14", SUNXI_GPA(13), 8 }, { "GPIO15", SUNXI_GPA(14), 10 }, { "GPIO18", SUNXI_GPA(16), 12 }, { "GPIO23", SUNXI_GPA(15), 16 }, { "GPIO24", SUNXI_GPC(4), 18 }, { "GPIO25", SUNXI_GPA(2), 22 }, { "GPIO8", SUNXI_GPC(3), 24 }, { "GPIO7", SUNXI_GPC(7), 26 }, { "GPIO29", SUNXI_GPA(18), 28 }, { "GPIO12", SUNXI_GPL(2), 32 }, { "GPIO16", SUNXI_GPL(4), 36 }, { "GPIO20", SUNXI_GPA(21), 38 }, { "GPIO21", SUNXI_GPA(20), 40 }, { { 0, 0, 0} }, } }, /* #define PIN_PG0 SUNXI_GPG(0) */ {"LED", { { "POWER_LED", SUNXI_GPL(10), 1 }, { "STATUS_LED", SUNXI_GPA(17), 2 }, { { 0, 0, 0} }, } }, }; #endif The problem is that even though I think I have it mapped correctly, when I run blinkly.py which is sets GPIO4 high, GPIO25 is the one that is getting set high. If anyone knows what I can do to correct this, or point me in the right direction. I would appreciate it.