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Setting onboard LEDs with rc.local or systemd


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Hallo,
 
this Mini-Howto describes how to change the behavior of the onboard LEDs during booting. There are many ways to do that. Two ways are shown here, a SysV style using /etc/rc.local and a systemd style using a configuration file in /etc/tmpfiles.d/. The systemd file is earlier interpreted than rc.local.
 
It is tested on Banana Pi M1*/M2/R1 with Debian jessie next (5.0x, 4.4.x).
* partly
 
Which LEDs could be accessed?
root@bananapim2:~# ls -1 /sys/class/leds/
bpi-m2:blue:usr
bpi-m2:green:usr
bpi-m2:red:usr

* The Banana Pi M1 lists the blue LED but it couldn't be set via /etc/tmpfiles.d/ or /etc/rc.local.

 
Which behaviors are possible?
root@bananapim2:~# cat /sys/class/leds/bpi-m2\:green\:usr/trigger 
none rc-feedback kbd-scrollock kbd-numlock kbd-capslock kbd-kanalock kbd-shiftlock kbd-altgrlock kbd-ctrllock kbd-altlock kbd-shiftllock kbd-shiftrlock kbd-ctrlllock kbd-ctrlrlock usb-gadget usb-host [mmc0] heartbeat cpu0 cpu1 cpu2 cpu3 default-on mmc1 rfkill0 
 
Edit /etc/rc.local to set the behavior of the onboard LEDs
root@bananapim2:~# cat /etc/rc.local
#!/bin/sh -e
echo "default-on" > /sys/class/leds/bpi-m2\:red\:usr/trigger
echo "mmc0" > /sys/class/leds/bpi-m2\:green\:usr/trigger
echo "heartbeat" > /sys/class/leds/bpi-m2\:blue\:usr/trigger

exit 0

or  edit /etc/tmpfiles.d/leds.conf.

root@bananapim2:~# cat /etc/tmpfiles.d/leds.conf 
w /sys/class/leds/bpi-m2:red:usr/trigger - - - - default-on
w /sys/class/leds/bpi-m2:green:usr/trigger - - - - mmc0
w /sys/class/leds/bpi-m2:blue:usr/trigger - - - - heartbeat

/etc/rc.local can be executed on the console, /etc/tmpfiles.d/leds.conf needs a reboot.

 
A third way may be to create systemd rules. But it doesn't work for me.
root@bananapim2:~# udevadm info -a -p /sys/class/leds/bpi-m2\:red\:usr
[snip]
  looking at device '/devices/platform/leds/leds/bpi-m2:red:usr':
    KERNEL=="bpi-m2:red:usr"
    SUBSYSTEM=="leds"
    DRIVER==""
    ATTR{brightness}=="255"
    ATTR{max_brightness}=="255"
    ATTR{trigger}=="none rc-feedback kbd-scrollock kbd-numlock kbd-capslock kbd-kanalock kbd-shiftlock kbd-altgrlock kbd-ctrllock kbd-altlock kbd-shiftllock kbd-shiftrlock kbd-ctrlllock kbd-ctrlrlock usb-gadget usb-host mmc0 heartbeat cpu0 cpu1 cpu2 cpu3 [default-on] mmc1 rfkill0 "
[snip]
 
root@bananapim2:~#nano /etc/udev/rules.d/10-leds.rules
 
For setting the LEDs via dts files, have a look at this discussion:
 
Regards,
Steve
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I'd like to add another method which I found "cleaner" and "easier".

Debian provides an easy way to set sysfs values after reboot via the /etc/sysfs.conf file and the /etc/sysfs.d/ directory.

(This is basically the same as the relation between the /proc/sys and sysctl.conf and sysctl.d.)

 

My use-case:

I wanted to set the red light on my OpiPC to the heartbeat effect.

This can be set manually with:

# echo heartbeat > /sys/class/leds/orangepi\:red\:status/trigger

The sysfs files format is really simple:

# the path omits the /sys/
path/to/the/settings = value

So all I had to do was:

# echo "class/leds/orangepi\:red\:status/trigger = heartbeat" > /etc/sysfs.d/red_led.conf

One can modify the sysfs.conf itself, but it's more pluggable/manageable via .conf files under the sysfs.d directory.

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Any idea how to register a trigger provider?

 

I'd be interested registering some code to strobe the led in a kind of morse-code.  Specifically I wanted to strobe the 32bit IPv4 address for fun.  Basically 1-blink for a zero-bit, 2-blink for a one-bit, with 1-beat rest between each bit and a 5-beat rest between each message/word.

# 'b' = blink
# '_' = no-blink
# '-' = rest
# 1-bit = 'b-b'
# 0-bit = 'b-_'
# stop = '_-_-_-_-_'
#
# IPv4 Addr: 10.10.10.10
# Binary: 0000 1010 0000 1010 0000 1010 0000 1010
# Msg: b-_-b-_-b-_-b-_-b-b-b-_-b-b-b-_-b-_-b-_-b-_-b-_-b-b-b-_-b-b-b-_-b-_-b-_-b-_-b-_-b-b-b-_-b-b-b-_-b-_-b-_-b-_-b-_-b-b-b-_-b-b-b-_-_-_-_-_-_

I'd image the 'blink-clock' to be at ether 2hz or 4hz.  This could obviously be fitted for reading out any register or combination of GPOs.  Some other encoding scheme may work.  Morse code is a good base 36 code and slightly more compact, but harder to decode for bit bangers.

 

Q: Real question is how does one register their script/binary as a 'trigger-provider'

A: Like this apparently.  kmod-ledtrig-morse.

 

Update: Tacked onto this reply as not to bloat the tutorial with chatter.

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Ok...no morse, but I made a small script to test if my AppleTalk on my Orange Pi ( called MacIPpi ) is still alive.

It will blink for 3 second the red led if it is alive and will be default-on if something goes wrong.

 

#!/bin/bash

nbplkup | grep 'MacIPpi' &> /dev/null 2>&1
if [ $? == 0 ]; then
echo "heartbeat" > /sys/class/leds/orangepi\:red\:status/trigger
sleep 3
echo "none" > /sys/class/leds/orangepi\:red\:status/trigger
else
echo "default-on" > /sys/class/leds/orangepi\:red\:status/trigger
fi

 

# /etc/crontab: system-wide crontab
# Unlike any other crontab you don't have to run the `crontab'
# command to install the new version when you edit this file
# and files in /etc/cron.d. These files also have username fields,
# that none of the other crontabs do.

SHELL=/bin/sh
PATH=/usr/local/sbin:/usr/local/bin:/sbin:/bin:/usr/sbin:/usr/bin

# m h dom mon dow user  command
17 *    * * *   root    cd / && run-parts --report /etc/cron.hourly
25 6    * * *   root    test -x /usr/sbin/anacron || ( cd / && run-parts --report /etc/cron.daily )
47 6    * * 7   root    test -x /usr/sbin/anacron || ( cd / && run-parts --report /etc/cron.weekly )
52 6    1 * *   root    test -x /usr/sbin/anacron || ( cd / && run-parts --report /etc/cron.monthly )

*  *    * * *   root    /bin/appletalk-test >/dev/null 2>&1

 

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  • Igor unpinned this topic

To illustrate my LED functionality I made a small YouTube movie to show how I use the red led to tell if my AppleTalk is working.

Have a look:

 

 

 

Part of my MacIPpi page:

 

http://www.macip.net/?page_id=113

 

This is the complete script:

 

#!/bin/bash

# flashes red led to display a working AppleTalk enviroment.
# when its sees MacIPpi in the nbplkup it is o.k.

echo "default-on" > /sys/class/leds/orangepi\:red\:status/trigger
sleep 0.6
echo "none" > /sys/class/leds/orangepi\:red\:status/trigger


nbplkup | grep 'MacIPpi' &> /dev/null
#echo $?
if [ $? == 0 ]; then
#   echo "matched"
# 6 seconds
echo "heartbeat" > /sys/class/leds/orangepi\:red\:status/trigger
sleep 4
echo "none" > /sys/class/leds/orangepi\:red\:status/trigger
sleep 10
# 19 seconds
echo "heartbeat" > /sys/class/leds/orangepi\:red\:status/trigger
sleep 4
echo "none" > /sys/class/leds/orangepi\:red\:status/trigger
sleep 10
# 33 seconds
echo "heartbeat" > /sys/class/leds/orangepi\:red\:status/trigger
sleep 4
echo "none" > /sys/class/leds/orangepi\:red\:status/trigger
sleep 11
# 47 seconds
echo "heartbeat" > /sys/class/leds/orangepi\:red\:status/trigger
sleep 4
echo "none" > /sys/class/leds/orangepi\:red\:status/trigger

else
echo "default-on" > /sys/class/leds/orangepi\:red\:status/trigger
#wall 'AppleTalk Down!'
fi

 

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