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JoeyBeelinkX2

Toggle CPU frequency with shortcut(s)?

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Below are supplementary quotes helpful to asking the question: can CPU presets be made into a desktop shortcut that could allow pre-defined CPU freq settings whether onthe fly or even reboot required?

Is so, what would the code be? That's the question I can't answer.

 

I ask because of the two Beelink X2s (one each of Armbian flavors); I'd like to get a hands-on feel for how high the temps can be expected to go. I probably won't be running hot for long, but then again I just received a bag of heat sinks and can also drill holes in the plastic box for better air circulation.

 

QUOTE 1 for reference:

Some boards allow to adjust CPU speed.

nano /etc/default/cpufrequtils
Alter min_speed or max_speed variable.

service cpufrequtils restart

QUOTE 2 for more reference:

 S/PDIF requires setting the minimum CPU frequency to 480MHz or higher

 

The 2nd quote is about keeping the lower end high enough to enable S/PDIF output.

 

-edited- no it doesn't have to be a GUI shortcut, but a line of code that can be copy/pasted every time would be every bit as cool.

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Why don't you simply adjust the config file and let throttling do the work later?

ENABLE=true
MIN_SPEED=480000
MAX_SPEED=912000
GOVERNOR=interactive

Monitoring can be done with 'armbianmonitor -m' or 'armbianmonitor -r' and to adjust settings every now and then (for reasons I fail to understand) there's the cpufreq-set command.

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The idea is for Desktop situations to "overclock" a while to see the difference.

As quoted:

"In case you want to have a few more percent maximum CPU performance you would need to set maximum cpufreq to 1200 MHz instead of ‘just’ 912 MHz maximum CPU clock using our newh3consumption tool. Be warned: this will both heavily increase consumption and SoC temperature since exceeding 912 MHz CPU clockspeed means feeding the SoC with 1.3V instead of 1.1V core voltage (most smaller H3 devices use a voltage regulator only switching between 2 voltages to feed the SoC based on load)."

 

In essence it's an extra core of processing power, which can have its time and place particularly with low-latency live audio processing for monitoring without so much of a delay. For playback or mixing, low processing is perfectly fine and you can do that on one core.    

I'm just trying to measure twice, cut once and seek advice if that which we can do in Windows and Mac is another impossibility/deal breaker/sorry I asked in Linux.

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Sorry, I don't use any of the devices Armbian supports as 'Desktop replacement', I do not even remotely think of doing the stuff I do on my macOS machines on cheap ARM devices for $30 or less and can't comment on anything Audio related anyway (since I don't do Audio stuff and the few times I dealt with that on Linux it felt brain-dead)

 

https://github.com/armbian/build/blob/master/config/fex/beelinkx2.fex#L1082

 

Beelink X2 implements no voltage regulation (prone to overheating) therefore it's useless to quote stuff that applies to other devices only.

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I use a BeelinkX2 as a light/cheap desktop replacement, mainly because is the best way to manage my others headless ARM boards by SSH sessions. Sometimes I perform flac to mp3 conversions in this machine without worrying about heat, as long time ago say @tkaiser : H3 is not an animal or a human being that gets hurt by temperatures exceeding 40°C. It's a chip rated for up to 125°C :) → 

Related to CPU throtling in the past I use some CPU desktop pluging monitor on Ubuntu but I d'ont know if working in this case: https://apps.ubuntu.com/cat/applications/quantal/indicator-cpufreq/

Also in the past I use on ODROID boards cpufrequtils like showed in this post: http://odroid.us/mediawiki/index.php?title=Use_cpufrequtils_to_Adjust_Processor_Settings

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Without me changing anything (that I know of, maybe it's interesting to someone to see Stellarium opening and taking a swing around. For one, I'm surprised at the 1200 MHz, and the heat of course went up quick. I'll break out those heatsinks very soon. Stellarium was pretty sluggish but it was over RDP so that could be part of it. And FWIW Samsung Evo 32GB for micro SD:

 

 root@beelinkx2:~# armbianmonitor -m
Stop monitoring using [ctrl]-[c]
Time        CPU    load %cpu %sys %usr %nice %io %irq   CPU
00:15:39: 1008MHz  0.18   7%   1%   5%   0%   0%   0%   58°C
00:15:44:  240MHz  0.17   7%   1%   5%   0%   0%   0%   58°C
00:15:50:  240MHz  0.15   7%   1%   5%   0%   0%   0%   58°C
00:15:55:  240MHz  0.14   7%   1%   5%   0%   0%   0%   58°C
00:16:00:  240MHz  0.13   7%   1%   5%   0%   0%   0%   58°C
00:16:05:  240MHz  0.12   7%   1%   5%   0%   0%   0%   58°C
00:16:10:  240MHz  0.11   7%   1%   5%   0%   0%   0%   58°C
00:16:16:  240MHz  0.10   7%   1%   5%   0%   0%   0%   59°C
00:16:21: 1008MHz  0.09   7%   1%   5%   0%   0%   0%   59°C
00:16:26: 1200MHz  0.09   7%   1%   5%   0%   0%   0%   61°C
00:16:31: 1200MHz  0.16   7%   1%   5%   0%   0%   0%   62°C
00:16:36: 1200MHz  0.23   7%   1%   5%   0%   0%   0%   63°C
00:16:41: 1200MHz  0.29   7%   1%   5%   0%   0%   0%   63°C
00:16:46: 1200MHz  0.35   7%   1%   5%   0%   0%   0%   63°C
00:16:51: 1008MHz  0.40   7%   1%   5%   0%   0%   0%   66°C
00:16:56: 1008MHz  0.45   7%   1%   5%   0%   0%   0%   67°C
00:17:02: 1008MHz  0.81   7%   1%   5%   0%   0%   0%   68°C
00:17:07: 1008MHz  1.06   7%   1%   5%   0%   0%   0%   68°C
00:17:12: 1008MHz  1.30   7%   1%   5%   0%   0%   0%   68°C
00:17:17: 1008MHz  1.59   7%   1%   5%   0%   0%   0%   68°C
00:17:22: 1008MHz  1.79   7%   1%   5%   0%   0%   0%   69°C
00:17:27: 1008MHz  1.80   7%   1%   5%   0%   0%   0%   69°C
00:17:32: 1008MHz  1.98   8%   1%   5%   0%   0%   0%   69°C
00:17:38: 1008MHz  2.22   8%   1%   5%   0%   0%   0%   69°C
00:17:43: 1008MHz  2.36   8%   1%   5%   0%   0%   0%   69°C
00:17:48: 1008MHz  2.49   8%   1%   5%   0%   0%   0%   69°C
00:17:53: 1008MHz  2.69   8%   1%   5%   0%   0%   0%   69°C
00:17:58: 1008MHz  2.56   8%   1%   5%   0%   0%   0%   62°C
00:18:03:  240MHz  2.35   8%   1%   5%   0%   0%   0%   61°C
00:18:08:  240MHz  2.25   8%   1%   5%   0%   0%   0%   60°C
00:18:14:  240MHz  2.07   8%   1%   5%   0%   0%   0%   61°C
00:18:19: 1008MHz  1.90   8%   1%   5%   0%   0%   0%   60°C
00:18:24:  240MHz  1.75   8%   1%   5%   0%   0%   0%   60°C
00:18:29:  240MHz  1.61   8%   1%   5%   0%   0%   0%   60°C

 

As for the other BeelinkX2 which is Debian (Armbian), Stellarium doesn't quite start without disappearing, but when it gets sorted that'll be a good comparison on the way to getting audio stuff running. 

 

Lastly a comment, I'm not trying to replicate a nice Windows or Mac system like I have on higher end hardware. But the original Android apps on these $30 boxes (security flaws be damned) run lightweight versions of most common desktop apps and could get a person by in a pinch if that's all you had on hand.   

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7 hours ago, JoeyBeelinkX2 said:

original Android apps

All this stuff run under old kernels and proprietary drivers and blobs. I'm agree with you about the slow response running Chrome (Chromiun) under armbian and the performance you can obtain using the same or equivalent Chrome under Android.

But is a matter of freedom, real freedom, vs a limited but good user experience.

 

This video is recorded using kazam https://launchpad.net/kazam on an Orange Pi One (only 512MB RAM) at the same time I use the system to show his capacities. Is not an intel Skull Canyon NUC http://amzn.to/2qR3YjY but can be useful in some scenarios.

 

 

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