Magnets

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  1. Like
    Magnets got a reaction from manuti in Upgrade from Orange pi PC?   
    That looks neat and essentially gives me 3 USB ports as I would be using USB-SATA adapter anyway but it's $55 USD including shipping to the UK
     
     
    sound good
  2. Like
    Magnets got a reaction from manuti in Upgrade from Orange pi PC?   
    I have an orange pi PC that I use as a simple NAS (NFS, smb, iscsi) and for openVPN occasionally but want something new with GbE.
     
    What is the best upgrade that will give me 2 or more usb ports, GbE and a faster processor? With decent software support ()? I don't need HDMI or wifi but it would be a plus
    512MB-1GB RAM
     
    opi zero plus?
    opi PC 2?
     
    Around $20 shipped ideally
  3. Like
    Magnets reacted to yam1 in Recommended SBC below 20USD range.   
    Here are some of my SBCs that are under $20 (see photo below).  I have divided them into two categories, with hdmi and not. The ones on the left are without, and on the right are with. The ones without are mostly orangepi's and nanopi's. Just do a search on their web sites and if it is under $20, I have it. One thing to consider is the ones with two spi channels (e.g. nanopi core 1 - note core 2 is better but its over $20), this would allow connecting two spi screens. If you connect two relatively big 3.2 ili9341 screens, with the browser stretched across them, your experience would still suffer but it would be okay in some extreme situations. The ones with hdmi include, raspberrypi zero w (double spi), nanopi A64 (double spi), pcduino4 nano (double spi), nanopi m1 - same as pcduino4 nano (double spi), and the other three orangepi's. Bananapi zero is slightly over $20, I have it connected to a lap dock. Of these, the best is pcduino4 nano (get it on ebay between $5 to $16), supported well in software (armbian), and nanopi a64 ($19.99?) is my second choice, software support is getting there (may be?), at least double spi works with pine64 image (latest kernel). Raspberrypi Zero W is only $5 from my local store, and dual spi screen with camera works, you really can't beat it in price.

  4. Like
    Magnets got a reaction from valant in SD card performance   
    Using performance gov on opi PC with Sandisk 16GB A1 on a usb card reader

     
    Command line used: iozone -e -I -a -s 100M -r 4k -r 16k -r 512k -r 1024k -r 16384k -i 0 -i 1 -i 2 Output is in kBytes/sec Time Resolution = 0.000001 seconds. Processor cache size set to 1024 kBytes. Processor cache line size set to 32 bytes. File stride size set to 17 * record size. random random bkwd record stride kB reclen write rewrite read reread read write read rewrite read fwrite frewrite fread freread 102400 4 3546 3573 5092 5086 4412 2948 102400 16 4588 8634 15272 15273 13885 7955 102400 512 21594 30277 36395 36542 35605 27344 102400 1024 28300 32080 36932 37035 36661 26242 102400 16384 30036 32860 37809 37933 37894 28773 iozone test complete. Purchased from aliexpress ($5) but the scratch & verify sticker says it's genuine
     
    My samsung evo 64gb went read-only recently (20 months old) and then would not boot. I copied to another card and ran fsck and all seems OK. I think the later evos were not as well made as the earlier batches.
     
     
  5. Like
    Magnets reacted to tkaiser in ROCK64   
    Hmm... to summarize the 'OpenSSL 1.0.2g  1 Mar 2016' results for the 3 boards/SoC tested above with some more numbers added (on all A53 cores with crypto extensions enabled performance is directly proportional to CPU clockspeeds -- nice):
    ODROID N1 / RK3399 A72 @ 2.0GHz: type 16 bytes 64 bytes 256 bytes 1024 bytes 8192 bytes aes-128-cbc 377879.56k 864100.25k 1267985.24k 1412154.03k 1489756.16k aes-192-cbc 325844.85k 793977.30k 1063641.34k 1242280.28k 1312189.10k aes-256-cbc 270982.47k 721167.51k 992207.02k 1079193.94k 1122691.75k ODROID N1 / RK3399 A53 @ 1.5GHz: type 16 bytes 64 bytes 256 bytes 1024 bytes 8192 bytes aes-128-cbc 103350.94k 326209.49k 683714.13k 979303.08k 1118808.75k aes-192-cbc 98758.18k 291794.65k 565252.01k 759266.99k 843298.13k aes-256-cbc 96390.77k 273654.98k 495746.99k 638750.04k 696857.94k MacchiatoBin / ARMADA 8040 @ 1.3GHz: type 16 bytes 64 bytes 256 bytes 1024 bytes 8192 bytes aes-128-cbc 360791.31k 684250.01k 885927.34k 943325.18k 977362.94k aes-192-cbc 133711.13k 382607.98k 685033.56k 786573.31k 854780.59k aes-256-cbc 314631.74k 553833.58k 683859.97k 719003.99k 738915.67k Orange Pi One Plus / H6 @ 1800 MHz: type 16 bytes 64 bytes 256 bytes 1024 bytes 8192 bytes aes-128-cbc 226657.97k 606014.83k 1013054.98k 1259576.66k 1355773.27k aes-192-cbc 211655.34k 517779.82k 809443.75k 963041.96k 1019251.37k aes-256-cbc 202708.41k 470698.97k 692581.21k 802039.13k 840761.34k NanoPi Fire3 / Nexell S5P6818 @ 1400 MHz (4.14.40 64-bit kernel): type 16 bytes 64 bytes 256 bytes 1024 bytes 8192 bytes aes-128-cbc 96454.85k 303549.92k 637307.56k 909027.59k 1041484.46k aes-192-cbc 91930.59k 274220.78k 527673.43k 705704.40k 785708.37k aes-256-cbc 89652.23k 254797.65k 460436.75k 594723.84k 648388.61k ROCK64 / Rockchip RK3328 @ 1296 MHz: type 16 bytes 64 bytes 256 bytes 1024 bytes 8192 bytes aes-128-cbc 163161.40k 436259.80k 729289.90k 906723.33k 975929.34k aes-192-cbc 152362.85k 375675.22k 582690.99k 693259.95k 733563.56k aes-256-cbc 145928.50k 337163.26k 498586.20k 577371.48k 605145.77k PineBook / Allwinner A64 @ 1152 MHz: type 16 bytes 64 bytes 256 bytes 1024 bytes 8192 bytes aes-128-cbc 144995.37k 387488.51k 648090.20k 805775.36k 867464.53k aes-192-cbc 135053.95k 332235.56k 516605.95k 609853.78k 650671.45k aes-256-cbc 129690.99k 300415.98k 443108.44k 513158.49k 537903.10k Espressobin / Marvell Armada 3720 @ 1000 MHz: type 16 bytes 64 bytes 256 bytes 1024 bytes 8192 bytes aes-128-cbc 68509.24k 216097.11k 453277.35k 649243.99k 741862.06k aes-192-cbc 65462.17k 194529.30k 375030.70k 503817.22k 559303.34k aes-256-cbc 63905.67k 181436.03k 328664.06k 423431.51k 462012.42k OPi PC2 / Allwinner H5 @ 816 MHz: type 16 bytes 64 bytes 256 bytes 1024 bytes 8192 bytes aes-128-cbc 102568.41k 274205.76k 458456.23k 569923.58k 613422.42k aes-192-cbc 95781.66k 235775.72k 366295.72k 435745.79k 461294.25k aes-256-cbc 91725.44k 211677.08k 313433.77k 362907.31k 380482.90k Banana Pi R2 / MediaTek MT7623 @ 1040 MHz and MTK Crypto Engine active type 16 bytes 64 bytes 256 bytes 1024 bytes 8192 bytes aes-128-cbc 519.15k 1784.13k 6315.78k 25199.27k 124499.22k aes-192-cbc 512.39k 1794.01k 6375.59k 25382.23k 118693.89k aes-256-cbc 508.30k 1795.05k 6339.93k 25042.60k 112943.10k MiQi / RK3288 @ 2000 MHz: type 16 bytes 64 bytes 256 bytes 1024 bytes 8192 bytes aes-128 cbc 87295.72k 94739.03k 98363.39k 99325.95k 99562.84k ODROID-HC1 / Samsung Exynos 5244 @ (A15 core @ 2000 MHz): type 16 bytes 64 bytes 256 bytes 1024 bytes 8192 bytes aes-128-cbc 78690.05k 89287.85k 94056.79k 95104.34k 95638.87k aes-192-cbc 69102.10k 77545.47k 81156.61k 81964.71k 82351.45k aes-256-cbc 61715.85k 68172.80k 71120.73k 71710.72k 72040.45k ODROID-C2 / Amlogic S905 @ 1752 MHz: type 16 bytes 64 bytes 256 bytes 1024 bytes 8192 bytes aes-128-cbc 51748.63k 59348.22k 62051.33k 62763.35k 62963.71k aes-192-cbc 46511.57k 52507.95k 54599.08k 55151.27k 55312.38k aes-256-cbc 42094.22k 46302.95k 47941.46k 48372.74k 48513.02k NanoPi M3 / Nexell S5P6818 @ 1400 MHz (3.4.39 32-bit kernel): type 16 bytes 64 bytes 256 bytes 1024 bytes 8192 bytes aes-128-cbc 44264.22k 54627.49k 58849.88k 59756.35k 60257.62k aes-192-cbc 39559.11k 47999.32k 51095.30k 51736.15k 52158.46k aes-256-cbc 35803.41k 42665.24k 44926.47k 45733.21k 45883.39k Clearfog Pro / Marvell Armada 38x @ 1600 MHz: type 16 bytes 64 bytes 256 bytes 1024 bytes 8192 bytes aes-128-cbc 47352.87k 54746.43k 57855.57k 58686.12k 58938.71k aes-192-cbc 41516.52k 47126.91k 49317.55k 49932.63k 50151.42k aes-256-cbc 36960.26k 41269.63k 43042.65k 43512.15k 43649.71k Raspberry Pi 3 / BCM2837 @ 1200 MHz: type 16 bytes 64 bytes 256 bytes 1024 bytes 8192 bytes aes-128-cbc 31186.04k 47189.70k 52744.87k 54331.73k 54799.02k aes-192-cbc 30170.93k 40512.11k 44541.35k 45672.11k 45992.62k aes-256-cbc 27073.50k 35401.37k 38504.70k 39369.39k 39616.51k Banana Pi M3 / Allwinner A83T @ 1800 MHz: type 16 bytes 64 bytes 256 bytes 1024 bytes 8192 bytes aes-128-cbc 36122.38k 43447.94k 45895.34k 46459.56k 46713.51k aes-192-cbc 32000.05k 37428.74k 39234.30k 39661.91k 39718.95k aes-256-cbc 28803.39k 33167.72k 34550.53k 34877.10k 35042.65k Banana Pi R2 / MediaTek MT7623 @ 1040 MHz: type 16 bytes 64 bytes 256 bytes 1024 bytes 8192 bytes aes-128-cbc 22082.67k 25522.92k 26626.22k 26912.77k 26995.37k aes-192-cbc 19340.79k 21932.39k 22739.54k 22932.82k 23008.60k aes-256-cbc 17379.62k 19425.11k 20058.03k 20223.66k 20267.01k Edit: Added results for Pinebook and ODROID-HC1 ensuring both were running at max cpufreq
     
    Edit 2: Added cpufreq settings for each tested device. Please note throttling dependencies and multi-threaded results below
     
    Edit 3: Added Banana Pi M3 single thread performance above. Performance with 8 threads sucks since A83T throttles down to 1.2GHz within 10 minutes and overall AES253 score is below 190000k.
     
    Edit 4: Added EspressoBin numbers from here. Another nice example for the efficiency of ARMv8 crypto extensions.
     
    Edit 5: Added NanoPi M3 numbers from there.
     
    Edit 6: Added Clearfog Pro numbers (Cortex-A9 -- unfortunately OpenSSL currently doesn't make use of CESA crypto engine otherwise numbers would be 3 to 4 times higher)
     
    Edit 7: Added Banana Pi R2 numbers from here (Cortex-A7, cpufreq scaling broken since ever so SoC only running with 1040 MHz, numbers might slightly improve once MTK manages to fix cpufreq scaling)
     
    Edit 8: Added numbers for ARMADA8040 (A72) from CNX comment thread.
     
    Edit 9: Added RK3288 (Cortex A17) numbers from here.
     
    Edit 10: Added RPI 3 (BCM2837) numbers. Please be aware that these are not Raspbian numbers but made with 64-bit kernel and Debian arm64 userland. When using Raspbian you get lower numbers!
     
    Edit 11: Added Allwinner H6 numers from here.
     
    Edit 12: Added RK3399 numbers from here.
     
    Edit 13: Added new S5P6818 numbers since now with mainline 64-bit kernel ARMv8 crypto extensions are available
  6. Like
    Magnets got a reaction from gounthar in What would you choose to record and broadcast video?   
    I'd use this to get the HDMI output of your DSLR encoded (720p only)
     
    https://blog.danman.eu/new-version-of-lenkeng-hdmi-over-ip-extender-lkv373a/
     
    Then a raspberry pi or pi0 to do the hw h264 re-encoding
  7. Like
    Magnets reacted to tkaiser in Running H3 boards with minimal consumption   
    I added a preliminary version of a new tool to our repo: h3consumption (please read there how to use/test this tool and provide feedback there also).
     
    Two examples for usage and savings:
     
    Orange Pi Plus 2E
      With our defaults (and no WiFi connection established!) the board idles at 1650 mW and 'h3consumption -p' displays:
    After execution of 'h3consumption -c 1 -m 1296 -d 408 -g off -e fast', commenting the 8189fs line in /etc/modules and a reboot the board idles at just 870 mW now. Disabling HDMI/GPU, using only Fast instead of Gbit Ethernet and lower DRAM clock are mostly responsible for saving 780 mW consumption! Disabling CPU cores is more a measure to limit maximum/peak consumption and should be avoided when it's only about lowering idle consumption. Now 'h3consumption -p' displays:
    Please keep in mind that we're talking about a quad core SBC with a performance above RPi 2 level but featuring 2 GB DRAM and 16 GB eMMC, having 4 real USB ports instead of 1, having a real Ethernet port instead of none and featuring one onboard WiFi instead of none. That costs as much as an RPi 2 while idling in the same mode way below (RPi 2 with USB/Ethernet ready/connected needs at least 1200 mW while OPi Plus 2E in the same mode with all 4 CPU cores active will idle at ~900 mW). And if we need performance instead of lowest consumption we can do so from userspace within seconds. The following brings back all CPU cores, switches to GBit Ethernet and enables WiFi: for i in 3 2 1; do echo 1 >/sys/devices/system/cpu/cpu${i}/online; done ethtool -s eth0 speed 1000 duplex full modprobe 8189fs && sleep 0.5 && ifconfig wlan0 up And if the work is done we can easily return to low-power mode again, still having an SBC with Ethernet ready/connected and 4 USB ports ready:
    ifconfig wlan0 down && sleep 0.5 && rmmod -f 8189fs ethtool -s eth0 speed 100 duplex full for i in 3 2 1; do echo 0 >/sys/devices/system/cpu/cpu${i}/online; done Another example:
     
    Orange Pi Lite
     
    With our defaults (and no WiFi connection established!) the board idles at 1060 mW and 'h3consumption -p' displays:
     
     
    With 'h3consumption -D 132 -c1 -g off -u off' we're switching in 'OPi Zero' mode by lowering DRAM clockspeed to just 132 MHz (experimental! Recommended minimum is 408 MHz), disabling all CPU cores but one, disabling HDMI/GPU and also all USB ports (Ethernet is here already disabled). In this mode connectivity is clearly restricted (not a single USB port active which saves ~125 mW) but if the Lite is just a data logger using some sensors and transmitting data every 24 hours it can happily operate in this 400 mW mode, switch on WiFi when needed, transmit the data and by disabling WiFi get back into low-power state again. Perfectly controllable from userspace, it's just:
    modprobe 8189fs && sleep 0.5 && ifconfig wlan0 up # wifi enabled ifconfig wlan0 down && sleep 0.5 && rmmod -f 8189fs # wifi disabled With these settings (nearly everything disabled in H3) the Lite is able to run with 400 mW. I made quick tests with NanoPi M1 (even ~20 mW less) and Orange Pi PC Plus (~20 mW more) and I think it's save to assume that all those smaller H3 boards behave the same here more or less (the NEO being the one exception due to PCB design and maybe different DRAM configurations, the GbE equipped boards showing higher ground consumption due to Gbit Ethernet PHY, more DRAM and so on)
     
    Summary
     
    Some h3consumption rules of thumb:
    Disabling GPU/HDMI on headless H3 devices (-g off) is always a good idea since it lowers consumption by +200 mW and also increases memory bandwidth which slightly improves performance Lowering DRAM clockspeed is also responsible for some savings but slightly decreases performance of some workloads. Going below 408 MHz is experimental but will show even higher savings Lowering peak and full load consumption can be done by limiting active CPU cores (-c 2 for example) or by limiting maximum cpufreq (-m 912 being the best possible value for H3 boards with the primitive voltage regulator since then NanoPi M1/NEO and OPi One/Lite will always remain at the lower 1.1V VDD_CPUX voltage which will result in huge savings under full load) On the Gigabit Ethernet equipped boards only negotiating Fast Ethernet (-e fast) saves almost 400 mW consumption (and most probably even more on the other end of the cable since modern GbE switches also lower consumption with Fast instead of Gbit Ethernet) Pro tip: Many of these settings are accessible from userspace and without a reboot. Just have a look at what h3consumption will add to /etc/rc.local to get the idea. In case an Orange Pi Plus 2E for example idles around most of the time since it is only used nightly to store backups from other machines one can easily combine lowest idle consumption with full performance in active periods. Simply use 'h3consumption -c 1 -m 1296 -d 624 -g off -e fast'. This will allow our usual 624 MHz DRAM clockspeed but to save energy in idle periods the following can be executed (script / cron job / whatever):
    echo 132000 >/sys/devices/platform/sunxi-ddrfreq/devfreq/sunxi-ddrfreq/userspace/set_freq for i in 3 2 1; do echo 0 >/sys/devices/system/cpu/cpu${i}/online; done ethtool -s eth0 speed 100 duplex full And then prior to execution of the backup jobs that require high performance we switch back to performance settings:
    echo 624000 >/sys/devices/platform/sunxi-ddrfreq/devfreq/sunxi-ddrfreq/userspace/set_freq for i in 3 2 1; do echo 1 >/sys/devices/system/cpu/cpu${i}/online; done ethtool -s eth0 speed 1000 duplex full
  8. Like
    Magnets got a reaction from tkaiser in Summary of boards for a NAS   
    On the ultra low end you can get a pogoplug v4, and if you get the pink version it has 2xUSB 3.0, 1xUSB2, SD slot, gigabit ethernet and a sata slot. They also come with a 12v/2A power supply and you don't have to buy a case. They have pretty crappy performance compared to the newer boards and do run hot.
     
    https://linuxengineering.wordpress.com/2014/08/03/performance-tuning-with-pogoplug-v4/
     
    You can pick them up on ebay for next to nothing, especially in the US
  9. Like
    Magnets got a reaction from tkaiser in SD card performance   
    32GB sandisk ultra
    root@orangepipcplus:~# iozone -e -I -a -s 100M -r 4k -r 16k -r 512k -r 1024k -r 16384k -i 0 -i 1 -i 2 Iozone: Performance Test of File I/O Version $Revision: 3.429 $ Compiled for 32 bit mode. Build: linux Command line used: iozone -e -I -a -s 100M -r 4k -r 16k -r 512k -r 1024k -r 16384k -i 0 -i 1 -i 2 Output is in kBytes/sec Time Resolution = 0.000001 seconds. Processor cache size set to 1024 kBytes. Processor cache line size set to 32 bytes. File stride size set to 17 * record size. random random bkwd record stride kB reclen write rewrite read reread read write read rewrite read fwrite frewrite fread freread 102400 4 2087 3278 7660 7666 6585 2525 102400 16 2193 2680 15009 15004 14165 4382 102400 512 7311 10130 21708 21690 21675 9219 102400 1024 11290 16439 22156 22163 22137 13792 102400 16384 17462 18827 22777 22779 22776 18479
  10. Like
    Magnets got a reaction from tkaiser in SD card performance   
    PNY SDXC 64GB UHS-I - rated 50MB/s
    Include fsync in write timing O_DIRECT feature enabled Auto Mode File size set to 102400 kB Record Size 4 kB Record Size 16 kB Record Size 512 kB Record Size 1024 kB Record Size 16384 kB Command line used: iozone -e -I -a -s 100M -r 4k -r 16k -r 512k -r 1024k -r 16384k -i 0 -i 1 -i 2 Output is in kBytes/sec Time Resolution = 0.000001 seconds. Processor cache size set to 1024 kBytes. Processor cache line size set to 32 bytes. File stride size set to 17 * record size. random random bkwd record stride kB reclen write rewrite read reread read write read rewrite read fwrite frewrite fread frer ead 102400 4 1182 1182 7421 7419 3163 1029 102400 16 2577 3512 14447 14524 8940 3230 102400 512 11793 16506 21625 21623 20965 17871 102400 1024 15319 16764 22187 22184 21804 18210 102400 16384 15889 17232 22911 22908 22886 18651
  11. Like
    Magnets got a reaction from mazarei in HW H.265 And H.264 Codec On H3   
    You need to run it as root. Not sure if there's a better way around it though
  12. Like
    Magnets got a reaction from mazarei in HW H.265 And H.264 Codec On H3   
    https://github.com/uboborov/ffmpeg_h264_H3
     
    To give you some idea, I get ~24FPS encoding 1080p h264 into 1080p h264 using cedrus.
     
    I doubt you will get much improved performance because SW decode h265 will be very slow
     
    I think a raspberry pi is better for video because the openmax platform has more support and allows hw decode too.
  13. Like
    Magnets got a reaction from Tido in Quick review of Orange Pi PC   
    Another review of that Ikea power supply: http://lygte-info.dk/review/USBpower%20Ikea%20Koppla%20UK.html