hmartin

Members
  • Content Count

    63
  • Joined

  • Last visited


Reputation Activity

  1. Like
    hmartin got a reaction from Werner in Orange Pi Zero wireless module status (XRADIO / ST CW1200)   
    First off, this happens on x86. Google "rowhammer" if you think that this kind of situation isn't a problem even for "expensive" computers.
     
     
    Xunlong never advertised the Orange Pi Zero as an AP! Please, show me where they said "use the Orange Pi Zero as a WiFi router"
     
    Even the cheapest WiFi routers that I know of cost $15 (AR9331/MT7620).
     
    This is additional functionality that we've been lucky to get from the WiFi radio, and now people are getting all pissed that it doesn't work as well as a Raspberry Pi.
     
    In my country, the Orange Pi Zero costs as much as a hamburger meal from McDonalds. Just try and use your hamburger as an AP...
     
    Fack, people. Lower your expectations.
  2. Like
    hmartin got a reaction from willmore in Orange Pi Zero /4.11.0-sun8i/ wlan0 is gone   
    exquisitus, I don't see how jhpadjustable's reply was patronizing, prejudiced, or full of attitude. He politely said that if you want to know the history of the module (and why it's not well supported) there are other threads talking about it. I really don't see how his reply is "less useful than no reply at all" since he told you where you can find more information (something you can also do with the forum's search feature).
     
    When people here provide information to users, and then get replies like yours, it's no wonder the driver situation doesn't improve. Anyone who is working to make it better just gets people coming and being offended by their answers.
     
    If you're unhappy with the state of the XR819 driver, I have the perfect place for you to go to solve your problems: https://github.com/fifteenhex/xradio/pulls
     
    I hate to say it, I really do, but I think you need to see this: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F-mju_gW3c8
  3. Like
    hmartin got a reaction from pfeerick in [Example] Support proposal for ROCK64   
    Two things I want to bring up:
    "Trial period" is a great idea, and this is what I was getting at: During the "trial period" nightly/stable builds are not available. Anyone wanting to test out the board during the trial period has to build an image from git themselves. This prevents devs from being mobbed by people for support when there are still lingering issues. Forums suck for finding information, and no one ever uses the search feature. So, wiki software. MediaWiki is FOSS, but the syntax sucks. Confluence isn't FOSS, but it is free for Open Source projects, and they have a really excellent editor. I'm not affiliated with Atlassian in any way, I just think if you want a usable, low-friction wiki, Confluence would be a good choice. I realize since Confluence is not FOSS, this has some negative appeal in some corners. Also it's Java...   
     
     
    We tried this already with the Orange Pi Zero. It just ended up pissing off everyone who was working on it (including me). No user seems willing to accept our explanations about performance and what is feasible. They think because the manufacturer says "WiFi" it will do the same things as their $1,200 laptop with dual-band 3x3 802.11ac.
     
    Why should I sit here and take shit from people who expect perfect WiFi from a $9 SBC and pay nothing toward Armbian? Especially after we calmly explain what isn't possible, they say "well I was thinking about giving you money, but since you can't make magic unicorns out of thin air, forget it" Seriously?! Seriously?!!! No. Please go away.
  4. Like
    hmartin got a reaction from tkaiser in [Example] Support proposal for ROCK64   
    The problem with these "certifications" is that then people expect everything to work perfectly. This simply isn't possible where someone can install any software with apt-get or compile it themselves. You'll say "Certified for Armbian" and then someone will say "but it doesn't work when I try to compile Firefox from source" which is obvious to anyone that there isn't enough memory, but you said "Certified for Armbian" so they assumed it could do anything.
     
    It's too difficult to say "Certified for X" and then expect the user to A. have reasonable expectations, and B. read the list of limitations (e.g. minor software/hardware issues).
     
     
    I don't see any problem for people to add support for boards via git. The best solution to avoid dealing with angry users is to not provide stable/nightly builds. If you force someone to compile Armbian from source to support a board, it raises the level of effort and technical knowledge required massively. People who know enough to compile Armbian for a board from git are the kind of people you want to come here.
     
     
    I disagree with having any private areas for board support. The reason is simple, it will keep out talented people who don't otherwise know about the hidden areas.
     
    I understand you want to avoid having users pile on with "+1" support for cheap shit, but there are easy ways to handle that.
     
    I think any discussion among developers about supporting a new board should be publicly visible, if not necessarily open for public comment. IMHO transparency is very important in open source. To have a closed section for making these decisions could potentially remove developers who want to support but are not part of any "inner circle"
     
    I would propose that the section is open for all users, but people who abuse it by starting threads full of "+1" are blocked from posting further. If this proves to be too difficult to maintain, then posting is restricted to developers.
     
    But my biggest concern is friction. It's hard enough to get developers, but if you make it harder for them to contribute, they simply won't come. Therefore we should be trying to make it as easy as possible for the next developers, who may not be known to us yet, to come and start developing for Armbian too.
     
     
    I still stand by my previous statements: Developer(s) commit to supporting a board. If the developer is no longer able to support the board, then someone else takes over. If the board is already "mature" and well supported, then perhaps no one is needed, but this would need to be considered for each board depending on the status.
     
    I go back to what I said earlier, I think Armbian should not build stable/nightly builds for "community supported" boards. Make it like the Android ROM scene: you provide the source for popular/well supported devices (e.g. Lineage OS "Official" devices), and other people are free to build their own image from source and post it here if they want (e.g. "Unofficial" builds). But make it more like XDA: there is a dev db listing the source/version/credits, and a big disclaimer that Armbian does not support these, WARRANTY VOID, etc.
     
    I think this would actually make more people contribute. Outside of the core devices, someone actually has to build the image themselves, post it here, and maybe provide support. If it gains enough traction, then Armbian could consider officially supporting it.
     
    I guess my point, and I don't make it very well, is this: make it easier for developers to contribute. Make it harder for users to download an image with half support. If someone cares enough to build an image from the source and post it here, then that shows some commitment from them.
     
    You don't necessarily have to stop supporting every board a vendor sends you. If you just love getting Armbian to boot on the latest hot garbage, then go for it. Why should we stop you? But leave these changes in git. Don't provide users with images they can easily flash.
  5. Like
    hmartin got a reaction from vlad59 in [Example] Support proposal for ROCK64   
    The problem with these "certifications" is that then people expect everything to work perfectly. This simply isn't possible where someone can install any software with apt-get or compile it themselves. You'll say "Certified for Armbian" and then someone will say "but it doesn't work when I try to compile Firefox from source" which is obvious to anyone that there isn't enough memory, but you said "Certified for Armbian" so they assumed it could do anything.
     
    It's too difficult to say "Certified for X" and then expect the user to A. have reasonable expectations, and B. read the list of limitations (e.g. minor software/hardware issues).
     
     
    I don't see any problem for people to add support for boards via git. The best solution to avoid dealing with angry users is to not provide stable/nightly builds. If you force someone to compile Armbian from source to support a board, it raises the level of effort and technical knowledge required massively. People who know enough to compile Armbian for a board from git are the kind of people you want to come here.
     
     
    I disagree with having any private areas for board support. The reason is simple, it will keep out talented people who don't otherwise know about the hidden areas.
     
    I understand you want to avoid having users pile on with "+1" support for cheap shit, but there are easy ways to handle that.
     
    I think any discussion among developers about supporting a new board should be publicly visible, if not necessarily open for public comment. IMHO transparency is very important in open source. To have a closed section for making these decisions could potentially remove developers who want to support but are not part of any "inner circle"
     
    I would propose that the section is open for all users, but people who abuse it by starting threads full of "+1" are blocked from posting further. If this proves to be too difficult to maintain, then posting is restricted to developers.
     
    But my biggest concern is friction. It's hard enough to get developers, but if you make it harder for them to contribute, they simply won't come. Therefore we should be trying to make it as easy as possible for the next developers, who may not be known to us yet, to come and start developing for Armbian too.
     
     
    I still stand by my previous statements: Developer(s) commit to supporting a board. If the developer is no longer able to support the board, then someone else takes over. If the board is already "mature" and well supported, then perhaps no one is needed, but this would need to be considered for each board depending on the status.
     
    I go back to what I said earlier, I think Armbian should not build stable/nightly builds for "community supported" boards. Make it like the Android ROM scene: you provide the source for popular/well supported devices (e.g. Lineage OS "Official" devices), and other people are free to build their own image from source and post it here if they want (e.g. "Unofficial" builds). But make it more like XDA: there is a dev db listing the source/version/credits, and a big disclaimer that Armbian does not support these, WARRANTY VOID, etc.
     
    I think this would actually make more people contribute. Outside of the core devices, someone actually has to build the image themselves, post it here, and maybe provide support. If it gains enough traction, then Armbian could consider officially supporting it.
     
    I guess my point, and I don't make it very well, is this: make it easier for developers to contribute. Make it harder for users to download an image with half support. If someone cares enough to build an image from the source and post it here, then that shows some commitment from them.
     
    You don't necessarily have to stop supporting every board a vendor sends you. If you just love getting Armbian to boot on the latest hot garbage, then go for it. Why should we stop you? But leave these changes in git. Don't provide users with images they can easily flash.
  6. Like
    hmartin got a reaction from zador.blood.stained in [Example] Support proposal for ROCK64   
    The problem with these "certifications" is that then people expect everything to work perfectly. This simply isn't possible where someone can install any software with apt-get or compile it themselves. You'll say "Certified for Armbian" and then someone will say "but it doesn't work when I try to compile Firefox from source" which is obvious to anyone that there isn't enough memory, but you said "Certified for Armbian" so they assumed it could do anything.
     
    It's too difficult to say "Certified for X" and then expect the user to A. have reasonable expectations, and B. read the list of limitations (e.g. minor software/hardware issues).
     
     
    I don't see any problem for people to add support for boards via git. The best solution to avoid dealing with angry users is to not provide stable/nightly builds. If you force someone to compile Armbian from source to support a board, it raises the level of effort and technical knowledge required massively. People who know enough to compile Armbian for a board from git are the kind of people you want to come here.
     
     
    I disagree with having any private areas for board support. The reason is simple, it will keep out talented people who don't otherwise know about the hidden areas.
     
    I understand you want to avoid having users pile on with "+1" support for cheap shit, but there are easy ways to handle that.
     
    I think any discussion among developers about supporting a new board should be publicly visible, if not necessarily open for public comment. IMHO transparency is very important in open source. To have a closed section for making these decisions could potentially remove developers who want to support but are not part of any "inner circle"
     
    I would propose that the section is open for all users, but people who abuse it by starting threads full of "+1" are blocked from posting further. If this proves to be too difficult to maintain, then posting is restricted to developers.
     
    But my biggest concern is friction. It's hard enough to get developers, but if you make it harder for them to contribute, they simply won't come. Therefore we should be trying to make it as easy as possible for the next developers, who may not be known to us yet, to come and start developing for Armbian too.
     
     
    I still stand by my previous statements: Developer(s) commit to supporting a board. If the developer is no longer able to support the board, then someone else takes over. If the board is already "mature" and well supported, then perhaps no one is needed, but this would need to be considered for each board depending on the status.
     
    I go back to what I said earlier, I think Armbian should not build stable/nightly builds for "community supported" boards. Make it like the Android ROM scene: you provide the source for popular/well supported devices (e.g. Lineage OS "Official" devices), and other people are free to build their own image from source and post it here if they want (e.g. "Unofficial" builds). But make it more like XDA: there is a dev db listing the source/version/credits, and a big disclaimer that Armbian does not support these, WARRANTY VOID, etc.
     
    I think this would actually make more people contribute. Outside of the core devices, someone actually has to build the image themselves, post it here, and maybe provide support. If it gains enough traction, then Armbian could consider officially supporting it.
     
    I guess my point, and I don't make it very well, is this: make it easier for developers to contribute. Make it harder for users to download an image with half support. If someone cares enough to build an image from the source and post it here, then that shows some commitment from them.
     
    You don't necessarily have to stop supporting every board a vendor sends you. If you just love getting Armbian to boot on the latest hot garbage, then go for it. Why should we stop you? But leave these changes in git. Don't provide users with images they can easily flash.
  7. Like
    hmartin got a reaction from lanefu in Orange Pi Zero /4.11.0-sun8i/ wlan0 is gone   
    exquisitus, I don't see how jhpadjustable's reply was patronizing, prejudiced, or full of attitude. He politely said that if you want to know the history of the module (and why it's not well supported) there are other threads talking about it. I really don't see how his reply is "less useful than no reply at all" since he told you where you can find more information (something you can also do with the forum's search feature).
     
    When people here provide information to users, and then get replies like yours, it's no wonder the driver situation doesn't improve. Anyone who is working to make it better just gets people coming and being offended by their answers.
     
    If you're unhappy with the state of the XR819 driver, I have the perfect place for you to go to solve your problems: https://github.com/fifteenhex/xradio/pulls
     
    I hate to say it, I really do, but I think you need to see this: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F-mju_gW3c8
  8. Like
    hmartin got a reaction from tkaiser in Nightly images?   
    I don't really think anyone disagrees with you. As I said in my previous post, this isn't a popularity contest of which boards are most popular (because that would probably end up being the cheapest, crappiest boards) but rather what Armbian developers are able to reasonably support.
     
    So here we are having the discussion. It seems like people are receiving dev samples for testing. If they decide to put in the effort to add support to Armbian, then the board will be supported.

    If later on, no one is taking care of the board and things are breaking, we can have a discussion to remove support.
  9. Like
    hmartin reacted to jernej in ROCK64   
    I know that Rockchip doesn't usually provide full user manuals, but is there a chance to get them anyway?
  10. Like
    hmartin reacted to tkaiser in Orange Pi Zero /4.11.0-sun8i/ wlan0 is gone   
    Who's that? Anyway: Please keep in mind that you're not in a one to one personal support chat here but in a public forum many people come accross by googling for specific stuff. So if someone from time to time summarizes actual state of affairs there's nothing wrong with it
     
    (at least I usually have a broader audience in mind than the person I'm actually answering when posting here. And yes, it happens again and again that this is considered just another insult)
  11. Like
    hmartin reacted to jhpadjustable in Orange Pi Zero /4.11.0-sun8i/ wlan0 is gone   
    See the "Orange Pi Zero wireless module status" pinned thread and other XR819-related threads in this H2/H3 subforum.  Shorter: Are you volunteering?   If not, then probably not:
    too many users with too little patience having too high expectations of too weak a wireless chip with too little and too poor public documentation/drivers You could fall back to the ill-reputed legacy kernel, obtain a supported USB wireless adapter, or configure and build your own kernel with xradio_wlan enabled https://github.com/armbian/build/.  Whatever you choose, good luck.
  12. Like
    hmartin got a reaction from tkaiser in The new Banana PI M2 Ultra   
    I still find the nightlies useful, but then again I know they are in development and don't expect them to be perfect. I realize other people don't understand this. Maybe you want to switch to a different model? Semi-regular releases with some automated testing. For people who want nightly builds, they can build it themselves. Agree. There needs to be a way to phase out support for boards if there is no more community support or they cannot be maintained. Agree. Armbian should not be "hey vendor, cheap out on software because Armbian will fix it for you" therefore I would propose: Only add boards where mainline support is coming/already implemented Only add boards where the hardware is of a certain quality (e.g. none of this micro USB powered shit, too time consuming to support people with stability issues) Only add boards when there is at least one dedicated developer who will be working on it (e.g. people can vote to support a new board, but unless someone is willing to contribute code, we aren't going to do the work. I'm thinking quite specifically of the Orange Pi Zero here, where people were complaining while contributing absolutely nothing)
  13. Like
    hmartin got a reaction from pfeerick in The new Banana PI M2 Ultra   
    While I agree that it is not our job to provide support to people buying the boards (that would be the manufacturer's responsibility) if someone wants to add support for the board in Armbian I don't see why we should refuse their help.
     
    Of course I have zero sympathy for people who come here and complain about the hardware decisions the vendor made (e.g. microUSB power, crappy EMMC, bad 1T1R WiFi) because that is entirely outside our control.
     
    So I would say, if someone does submit patches to support the Banana Pi M2U or Berry, we accept it. But it is also wise to put up a disclaimer that any images for Banana Pi come with zero support and we will ignore requests for free support on the forums.
  14. Like
    hmartin got a reaction from Tido in Quick Pinebook Preview / Review   
    10,000mAh. They have the full specifications published on the website...
     
     
    Can it still operate from AC power if you unplug the battery? Or is this a single power supply device like most cellphones?
     
    Edit: according to the schematics, you should be able to disconnect the battery and still have it powered, unless I'm misunderstanding the function of the AXP803?
     
    The only reason I ask is because it's probably easier to unplug the battery and observe the power consumption from the wall than trying to measure between the battery and the main PCB.
     
    Or maybe there is a sysfs entry for the current out of the battery?
  15. Like
    hmartin got a reaction from pfeerick in Orange Pi Zero went to the market   
    Show me where on that page is says "AP"
     
    A wireless server can be any computer connected via WiFi which exchanges data. e.g. it's connected as a client and runs an HTTP server where you can download files.
     
    Boom! Wireless. Server.
     
     
     
    So you won't donate to us, volunteers who spend our own time and money to buy the hardware and improve it, because we didn't make a perfect product that can do everything you dream of?
     
     
    If people like you didn't complain so much, we might actually have the time and motivation to do "innovation"
     
    This is the n'th time you've suggested that we take even more time away from "innovation" to create an FAQ for lazy people like you who can't be bothered to read the forum or mailing list.
     
    I will again suggest that you can spend your own time making the monthly FAQ, instead of posting complaints on the forum about how we don't follow your every suggestion.
     
     
     
    Excuse me? Our answers are 'abusing' you?
     
    Please. Get a grip. We're the ones actually improving the features you all are using, and what do we get? You publicly congratulating yourself for not donating money to the cause and complaining that it doesn't work.
     
    Why do we work on this at all? Maybe because we bought the hardware, realized that it has limitations, and are working to improve it for our own use. We could certainly improve it and keep the improvements to ourselves. We're not selling a product, we're not required to push our patches upstream.
     
    Unlike you, I don't go to internet forums of open source projects and whine that my expectations weren't immediately satisfied. I'm actually trying to improve things to the point where your completely unrealistic expectations ARE realized.
     
     
     
    If you want to see "innovation" go use the Debian image from Xunlong: http://www.orangepi.org/downloadresources/ Do your own research before buying. You're presumably an adult, it's not our job to educate you before you spend money. We're able to spot marketing bullshit before buying, and adjust our expectations accordingly. I'd suggest you file this under a "learning experience" that not everything the salesmen tell you is true. At $10, it's a pretty cheap life lesson. We'd have a much better attitude if people like you didn't show up to lecture us on how we should be "innovating" more. The best thing you personally can do for innovation right now, is put away your Orange Pi Zero, stop posting stupid missives like the one above, and come back in 6 months.
  16. Like
    hmartin got a reaction from pfeerick in Orange Pi Zero wireless module status (XRADIO / ST CW1200)   
    Yes, I was able to find wsm_22.bin as well, it's in linux-firmware. However if you look at fwio.h, there are way more firmware files for this driver:
    #define BOOTLOADER_CW1X60 "boot_cw1x60.bin" #define FIRMWARE_CW1X60 "wsm_cw1x60.bin" #define FIRMWARE_CUT22 "wsm_22.bin" #define FIRMWARE_CUT20 "wsm_20.bin" #define FIRMWARE_CUT11 "wsm_11.bin" #define FIRMWARE_CUT10 "wsm_10.bin" #define SDD_FILE_CW1X60 "sdd_cw1x60.bin" #define SDD_FILE_22 "sdd_22.bin" #define SDD_FILE_20 "sdd_20.bin" #define SDD_FILE_11 "sdd_11.bin" #define SDD_FILE_10 "sdd_10.bin" I guess these files were never released.
     
    The wsm_##.bin and sdd_##.bin files seem to be for specific versions of the hardware. After changing the SDIO ID of the chip, the cw1200 driver is detecting the silicon as CW1X60_HW_REV and attempting to load boot_cw1x60.bin, sdd_cw1x60.bin, and wsm_cw1x60.bin.
     
    If you do a hexdump on the boot_xr819.bin from Allwinner, it appears to be a loader for the rest of the firmware (wsm_*.bin files):
    000008c0 72 65 64 0a 00 00 00 00 57 53 43 5f 4c 4f 41 44 |red.....WSC_LOAD| 000008d0 45 52 5f 46 57 5f 41 30 31 5f 30 30 5f 30 30 30 |ER_FW_A01_00_000| 000008e0 31 3a 41 75 67 20 31 39 20 32 30 31 35 2c 20 31 |1:Aug 19 2015, 1| 000008f0 38 3a 35 37 3a 35 31 3a 41 53 49 43 0a 00 00 00 |8:57:51:ASIC....| 00000900 28 20 70 7f |( p.|  
    We do have a working bootloader, it's boot_xr819.bin from the Allwinner SDK.
     
     
     
    Thanks, I'll just call up ST-Ericsson and ask them for their firmware reference manual 
  17. Like
    hmartin got a reaction from willmore in Orange Pi Zero off-topic discussion #2   
    You're welcome to submit a u-boot patch to support it faster.
  18. Like
    hmartin got a reaction from willmore in Orange Pi Zero went to the market   
    OpenWrt is far more suited to industrial environments. Most OpenWrt hardware uses NOR flash, which does not degrade via reads, NAND does.
     
    Wikipedia has more details on this: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flash_memory#Read_disturb
     
    You can even buy OpenWrt devices which use NAND, if you need more storage. These routers have more than enough horse power for almost any M2M application, and you can buy them pretty cheap: https://www.aliexpress.com/item/Original-Xiaomi-WIFI-Router-3-WiFi-Repeater-1167Mbps-2-4G-5GHz-ROM-128MB-Wi-Fi-Roteador/32688259842.html
     
     
     
    Supporting Linux on these cheap SBCs is not a total waste of time, but it might be for your use case.
     
    Yes, you absolutely need to buy multiple boards and test them for your use case. Or you can call a distributor like Digikey and ask them for the right board for your application. You will pay a lot more for this, it won't be as new as the Orange Pi Zero, it will probably use some vendor proprietary toolchain and Linux image, but it will work for 10 years and your customers won't hate your product because you thought it would be good to build it around a $10 SBC from China.
     
     
    No one is saying you can expect stability from an Orange Pi Zero for your use case. You need to test it yourself and figure out whether it's stable or not. We don't have the resources to test the hardware in your use case.
     
    Please, email Xunlong and ask your questions. See if you get any response back, or how helpful it is.
     
    This forum has a search feature. A contributing factor to this "abusive language" as you put it, is that 20 people ask the same questions over and over again instead of searching the forum for the last time this question was asked, looking at the answer, and then accepting that the situation isn't as they had hoped.
  19. Like
    hmartin got a reaction from willmore in Orange Pi Zero went to the market   
    Show me where on that page is says "AP"
     
    A wireless server can be any computer connected via WiFi which exchanges data. e.g. it's connected as a client and runs an HTTP server where you can download files.
     
    Boom! Wireless. Server.
     
     
     
    So you won't donate to us, volunteers who spend our own time and money to buy the hardware and improve it, because we didn't make a perfect product that can do everything you dream of?
     
     
    If people like you didn't complain so much, we might actually have the time and motivation to do "innovation"
     
    This is the n'th time you've suggested that we take even more time away from "innovation" to create an FAQ for lazy people like you who can't be bothered to read the forum or mailing list.
     
    I will again suggest that you can spend your own time making the monthly FAQ, instead of posting complaints on the forum about how we don't follow your every suggestion.
     
     
     
    Excuse me? Our answers are 'abusing' you?
     
    Please. Get a grip. We're the ones actually improving the features you all are using, and what do we get? You publicly congratulating yourself for not donating money to the cause and complaining that it doesn't work.
     
    Why do we work on this at all? Maybe because we bought the hardware, realized that it has limitations, and are working to improve it for our own use. We could certainly improve it and keep the improvements to ourselves. We're not selling a product, we're not required to push our patches upstream.
     
    Unlike you, I don't go to internet forums of open source projects and whine that my expectations weren't immediately satisfied. I'm actually trying to improve things to the point where your completely unrealistic expectations ARE realized.
     
     
     
    If you want to see "innovation" go use the Debian image from Xunlong: http://www.orangepi.org/downloadresources/ Do your own research before buying. You're presumably an adult, it's not our job to educate you before you spend money. We're able to spot marketing bullshit before buying, and adjust our expectations accordingly. I'd suggest you file this under a "learning experience" that not everything the salesmen tell you is true. At $10, it's a pretty cheap life lesson. We'd have a much better attitude if people like you didn't show up to lecture us on how we should be "innovating" more. The best thing you personally can do for innovation right now, is put away your Orange Pi Zero, stop posting stupid missives like the one above, and come back in 6 months.
  20. Like
    hmartin reacted to zador.blood.stained in Orange Pi Zero went to the market   
    This depends on your definition of "stability". These boards (most of them) will run perfectly stable on your desk (especially when using mainline kernel), but please keep in mind that these are the cheap development boards and not the industrial-grade PLCs. These are not designed to work in wide temperature range (especially below 0 Â°C), have minimal or close to zero power supply voltage filtering capability, minimal ESD, overvoltage, overcurrent, wrong polarity, strong EMI, dust, dew, moisture, etc. protection, and reliability may be affected by unclean shutdowns, so if you design any kind of hardware project, you have to know what these boards are capable of and treat them accordingly.
  21. Like
    hmartin reacted to zador.blood.stained in Orange Pi Zero went to the market   
    I checked the first 10 pages of this subforum and found 11 threads describing different OPi Zero wireless related issues and questions, not counting this one and locked development related one. I think it's a good indication of what you should expect from this wireless module.
    The thread that you posted in was related to the ongoing development and improvements of the driver, and after a dozen messages it turned into off-topic discussions, so it was closed for a good reason.
     
    Also please keep in mind that Armbian is a non-commercial project too, not affiliated with Xunlong. We didn't make the board manufacturer use this wireless module, we didn't advertise any wireless related specifications or abilities like perfectly working AP mode, and constant unending spam of same questions and reports can make any developer regret that he decided to support this device.
     
    Opi Zero it's still a good device for its price, just imagine that it doesn't have onboard wireless module. Want similar device with wireless? I think NanoPi Air may be a good alternative.
  22. Like
    hmartin reacted to Igor in Orange Pi Zero went to the market   
    What if you already received best possible answers and you are simply not willing to accept the facts? In any case, do more research, try to understand the background if you wanna discuss it and stop abusing forum for your personal consulting service and we will treat you accordingly. Right @athamarmian?
  23. Like
    hmartin reacted to tkaiser in Orange Pi Zero wireless module status (XRADIO / ST CW1200)   
    Ok, for all the "Buy cheap, Buy twice" fellows doing the necessary research only after they bought hardware here's a great (and the official) place to discuss the funny mismatch between expectations and reality: http://www.orangepi.org/orangepibbsen/forum.php?mod=forumdisplay&fid=67
  24. Like
    hmartin got a reaction from zador.blood.stained in Orange Pi Zero wireless module status (XRADIO / ST CW1200)   
    First off, this happens on x86. Google "rowhammer" if you think that this kind of situation isn't a problem even for "expensive" computers.
     
     
    Xunlong never advertised the Orange Pi Zero as an AP! Please, show me where they said "use the Orange Pi Zero as a WiFi router"
     
    Even the cheapest WiFi routers that I know of cost $15 (AR9331/MT7620).
     
    This is additional functionality that we've been lucky to get from the WiFi radio, and now people are getting all pissed that it doesn't work as well as a Raspberry Pi.
     
    In my country, the Orange Pi Zero costs as much as a hamburger meal from McDonalds. Just try and use your hamburger as an AP...
     
    Fack, people. Lower your expectations.
  25. Like
    hmartin got a reaction from Igor in Orange Pi Zero wireless module status (XRADIO / ST CW1200)   
    First off, this happens on x86. Google "rowhammer" if you think that this kind of situation isn't a problem even for "expensive" computers.
     
     
    Xunlong never advertised the Orange Pi Zero as an AP! Please, show me where they said "use the Orange Pi Zero as a WiFi router"
     
    Even the cheapest WiFi routers that I know of cost $15 (AR9331/MT7620).
     
    This is additional functionality that we've been lucky to get from the WiFi radio, and now people are getting all pissed that it doesn't work as well as a Raspberry Pi.
     
    In my country, the Orange Pi Zero costs as much as a hamburger meal from McDonalds. Just try and use your hamburger as an AP...
     
    Fack, people. Lower your expectations.