esbeeb

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  1. Like
    esbeeb got a reaction from lanefu in New administrator   
    Yay, @lanefu!
  2. Like
    esbeeb reacted to Igor in New administrator   
    @lanefu will help around admin duties.
  3. Like
    esbeeb reacted to Igor in NanoPi Neo 2, memory leak in proftpd, even worse if SSL encrypted   
    Application is not critical and my proposition is that if he find a working hack to patch this, why not? I am patching Chromium this way, because its a popular app and its a total mess upstream. It doesn't work in STABLE build at all. In general, many hacks are done dirty and you don't complain because you don't know about. Debian is not automotive grade Linux. At leas you and me know that, while most of the people out there have no clue.

    Armbian implicates its something to do with ARM and something to do with Debian(Ubuntu) and we are trapped inside this. Its a build system in its core, yes. What that builds system does? It makes board support packages (u-boot, kernel and board specifics hacks) and bind them with a Debian like system to a boot-able image ... which gets distributed. We define package base, we change some settings and we fix some user land bugs. This was the initial idea, this idea was shaped trough the time and will be changed, adjusted in the future.
     
    Why shell a few Armbian folks, which are anyway busy with more important and very specific stuff, report and fix generic architecture agnostic upstream bugs? Should I deal with a bug that is found by 3rd party in proftpd? Do I want? NO. Is that my responsibility? The same as from anyone. Do I have time to deal with that? Absolutely no.
     

    By updating a single app which is broken anyway? Calm down.
     

    Nothing specific. Because people are used to this user land perhaps? Perhaps because there is not possible to produce automotive Linux with resources which are available?

    Changing to something better and keep maintaining Armbian at the same time? How? Why?
     

    Debian folks are also doing mistakes (because they are human?) ... but yes, I agree with you - Debian uses outdated package base. Mint? Is RedHat branch or Arch any better? Perhaps Gentoo?
    Now what? We are tied to Debian, which has outdated package base. Ubuntu can only be slightly better or worse. We had discussions and ideas in the past to implement or fork some existing Linux from the embedded side. Something very very minimal (Alpine?), which is limited in functions ... and problems. 

    Our Linux is limited to ARM platform. Whenever we stay limited only on ARM, development in sense of going on new/own user land path represent a waste of resources if dealing only with ARM. And we open yet another box of related problems.
  4. Like
    esbeeb reacted to JMCC in NanoPi Neo 2, memory leak in proftpd, even worse if SSL encrypted   
    Debian people are very good at backporting security fixes. Why not just make a bug report there?
  5. Like
    esbeeb reacted to Igor in NanoPi Neo 2, memory leak in proftpd, even worse if SSL encrypted   
    If installing packages from https://packages.debian.org/buster/proftpd-basic (+ this app dependencies) solves this problem, we can put them to our repository. Upload here and sent PR: https://github.com/armbian/upload/tree/master/debs

    If not, we have nothing else, but wait that Debian people fix this upstream.
  6. Like
    esbeeb reacted to martinayotte in NanoPi Neo 2, memory leak in proftpd, even worse if SSL encrypted   
    Edit the following file : /etc/default/armbian-zram-config
  7. Like
    esbeeb got a reaction from WarHawk_AVG in NanoPi Neo 2 LTS: net I/O speed tests, etc.   
    Here's what I think the problem is.  The USB port on the NanoPi Neo 2 mainboard itself works well with the default UAS driver from the kernel.  But the second USB port, which seems to be an afterthought on the NAS kit accessory board, does NOT work well with the UAS driver from the kernel.  Why would I conclude this?  Because when I put the "problematic" (seeming) drive onto the other USB port (on the mainboard of the NanoPi) the problem went away.
     
    Edit: I found the fix I needed, detailed here.
  8. Like
    esbeeb got a reaction from WarHawk_AVG in NanoPi Neo 2 LTS: net I/O speed tests, etc.   
    Here's a picture of the NAS I've set up for our small office here:
     
     

     
    Inside the NAS kit aluminum case on the top is a 500GB SSD, and there are two more 3.5" drives on the bottom, in enclosures, attached with USB 2.0 cables.  OpenMediaVault uses all 3 drives.
  9. Like
    esbeeb got a reaction from chwe in Recommended SBC below 20USD range.   
    I've got a NanoPi Neo Core 2, with the NAS kit.  It lets me attach a 2.5" SATA SSD drive, all contained in an aluminium case (which elevates it above "toy", to my eyes).  The whole kit, minus SSD hard drive, was about $80 (and I'd call this a good value, worth it), however shipping from China took a long time (like a few weeks to a month).  Disk performance isn't stellar, but it doesn't suck either.  Much more performant-feeling than a Raspberry Pi.  It's adequate, to make your own personal LAN server, like say OpenMediaVault (for serving SMB file shares), or Nextcloud (DAV file shares, with SSL encryption, work great in Gnome Nautilus out-of-the-box, or Linux Mint's file manager, Nemo, once you install the package "davfs2"). 
     
    Small home offices should be a good fit for this kit, where LAN file-share usage day-to-day is light-to-mediumly demanding.
     
    What I love about this kit is that the H5 CPU has decent mainline kernel support.  This helps to assure me that this board won't just be a "flash in the pan", and I'll very likely be able to get kernel security updates for at least a few years into the future.
     
    I mention this all to underscore my earlier point that to get something minimally sturdy, performant, long-lasting and above all useful in a way that goes beyond a tinkerer's toy (which can be a great starting point for many, don't get me wrong), then to me, this $80 kit is about the lowest I'd personally go.  For $20, I'd rather go eat a pizza or something.
  10. Like
    esbeeb got a reaction from tommy in Recommended SBC below 20USD range.   
    OK, you've got me there.  I must say I dislike the mUSB power connector, and would prefer a sane barrel connector.
  11. Like
    esbeeb reacted to Igor in NextCloudPi on Armbian ( tested odroid HC1 )   
    In this case we only call @nachoparker install script from Softy menu: https://github.com/armbian/config/blob/master/debian-software#L523-L525
  12. Like
    esbeeb reacted to nachoparker in NextCloudPi on Armbian ( tested odroid HC1 )   
    @yogui  @esbeeb @Igor and the rest
     
    The curl installer (and softy) should be fixed now. Still testing it but if you want to try it out and confirm that would be great.

    Also generating an image for the OrangePi Zero Plus 2, should be uploaded to ownyourbits.com/downloads/testing shortly
     
    I managed to have Sury provide a php7.2-redis package for armhf, so it shouldn't break again

    Looking for somebody to test the banana pi image (I don't own one), and if you guys want images for any board not yet supported just tell me.
  13. Like
    esbeeb got a reaction from chwe in Recommended SBC below 20USD range.   
    I've got a NanoPi Neo Core 2, with the NAS kit.  It lets me attach a 2.5" SATA SSD drive, all contained in an aluminium case (which elevates it above "toy", to my eyes).  The whole kit, minus SSD hard drive, was about $80 (and I'd call this a good value, worth it), however shipping from China took a long time (like a few weeks to a month).  Disk performance isn't stellar, but it doesn't suck either.  Much more performant-feeling than a Raspberry Pi.  It's adequate, to make your own personal LAN server, like say OpenMediaVault (for serving SMB file shares), or Nextcloud (DAV file shares, with SSL encryption, work great in Gnome Nautilus out-of-the-box, or Linux Mint's file manager, Nemo, once you install the package "davfs2"). 
     
    Small home offices should be a good fit for this kit, where LAN file-share usage day-to-day is light-to-mediumly demanding.
     
    What I love about this kit is that the H5 CPU has decent mainline kernel support.  This helps to assure me that this board won't just be a "flash in the pan", and I'll very likely be able to get kernel security updates for at least a few years into the future.
     
    I mention this all to underscore my earlier point that to get something minimally sturdy, performant, long-lasting and above all useful in a way that goes beyond a tinkerer's toy (which can be a great starting point for many, don't get me wrong), then to me, this $80 kit is about the lowest I'd personally go.  For $20, I'd rather go eat a pizza or something.
  14. Like
    esbeeb got a reaction from tommy in Recommended SBC below 20USD range.   
    I suggest being willing to spend considerably more than $20.  Once you go too cheap, the quality of workmanship goes down so much, that you'll likely end up regretting you didn't spend more, when your board fails on you with the slightest mishap.  For example, don't expect all these Raspberry Pi knockoffs to be anywhere as robustly constructed as the Raspberry Pi itself (which is entirely made out industrial-grade components, albeit the performance is slow).  I do not work for Raspberry Pi, BTW, but I own two of them, and appreciate their robust construction.
     
    Don't get me wrong, I'm a fan of cheap.  But what I want is "Cheap and Cheery", not "Cheap and Grumpy."  Excruciatingly cheap boards will likely bite you for your cheapness.  There's a slightly higher price to go from "Cheap and Grumpy", up to "Cheap and Cheery."  Lurking on this forum for a good long while will eventually help you to discern between the two.
  15. Like
    esbeeb got a reaction from chwe in Recommended SBC below 20USD range.   
    I've got a NanoPi Neo Core 2, with the NAS kit.  It lets me attach a 2.5" SATA SSD drive, all contained in an aluminium case (which elevates it above "toy", to my eyes).  The whole kit, minus SSD hard drive, was about $80 (and I'd call this a good value, worth it), however shipping from China took a long time (like a few weeks to a month).  Disk performance isn't stellar, but it doesn't suck either.  Much more performant-feeling than a Raspberry Pi.  It's adequate, to make your own personal LAN server, like say OpenMediaVault (for serving SMB file shares), or Nextcloud (DAV file shares, with SSL encryption, work great in Gnome Nautilus out-of-the-box, or Linux Mint's file manager, Nemo, once you install the package "davfs2"). 
     
    Small home offices should be a good fit for this kit, where LAN file-share usage day-to-day is light-to-mediumly demanding.
     
    What I love about this kit is that the H5 CPU has decent mainline kernel support.  This helps to assure me that this board won't just be a "flash in the pan", and I'll very likely be able to get kernel security updates for at least a few years into the future.
     
    I mention this all to underscore my earlier point that to get something minimally sturdy, performant, long-lasting and above all useful in a way that goes beyond a tinkerer's toy (which can be a great starting point for many, don't get me wrong), then to me, this $80 kit is about the lowest I'd personally go.  For $20, I'd rather go eat a pizza or something.
  16. Like
    esbeeb reacted to NicoD in Recommended SBC below 20USD range.   
    Works in firefox. Even in Armbian. I don't know how. But it does. But Firefox does suck for surfing.
    For that I use Vivaldi. There 1/3 lost frames in 1080p Youtube. Chromium 2/3 lost frames. Firefox 0 frames lost. All video works perfect. I even use it as video player on the NanoPi M4.
    For me the NanoPi M4 is the perfect 2nd desktop pc. It's very fast. It's got an amazing heatsink. It's stable, haven't had 1 crash with it in hundreds of hours use. I've tried many different sbc's on there desktop capabillity's. The Odroid C2 was the best until the NanoPi M4.
    Tinker board does ok in video, but many things don't work. I've tried it again this week, and it even got worse. I need 3 different OS'es to be able to do everything.
    To my knowledge not many others than the C2, tinker, rasp and RK3399 have HW acc in Linux. The Raspberry sucks to work with.
  17. Like
    esbeeb reacted to hojnikb in Recommended SBC below 20USD range.   
    Guys, you're going at this all wrong. For desktop use and 20$ best bet for a good experience is a used Dell, HP with a Core2 Duo type cpu. These are plentiful, since businesses get rid of them and you can easily pick one up for 20$ or less if you shop around.
     
    It's going to give you much better desktop experience with common apps and OS than any A7 or A53 based SBC (these CPUs are muuuch slower than Core2). If you can spring extra $$$ for a few more gigs of ram (these typically come with either 2 or 4GB of ram) and a 60GB SSD (18$ from aliexpress) you can get a fluid desktop experience for peanuts.
  18. Like
    esbeeb reacted to NicoD in NanoPi M4 performance and consumption review   
    Here my temperatures with a small fan on the underside and some screws to raise it. As tkaiser said. It works better when the fan blows over a larger area. This works good enough.
    It's a great heatsink. But the downside is that it heats up the whole board. So I don't think it's healty to constantly run it at 85°C. I've done it for 1h for a test. The board smelled badly. I want do it again. With low loads it doesn't heat up quickly.

    Temperature
    ---------------
    Armbian Bionic/Stretch 64-bit 2Ghz + 1.5Ghz
                            With fan idle        36°C
                            With fan maxed   65°C
                            No fan idle           40°C
                            No fan maxed     Throttles at 85°C after 14m30s
                            
    Lubuntu armhf/arm64 1.8Ghz + 1.4GHz
                            With fan idle       29°C
                            With fan maxed   54°C
                            No fan idle          42°C
                            No fan maxed     69°C (after 30 minutes maxed)



  19. Like
    esbeeb reacted to mindee in NanoPi M4 performance and consumption review   
    Thanks for your suggestion, we made a SATA HAT prototype for NanoPi M4, it can connect  with 4x 3.5inch hard drive and work well.
     
     
  20. Like
    esbeeb reacted to Igor in when linux 4.19 is released LTS, which ARM-related features are you most excited about?   
    Armbian is mostly ahead of the upstream kernel releases in board specific functions. Up to about one year. Regarding the biggest group (Allwinner), the only change will be that we will remove a few patches  and when 4.19.y is sorted out it will become our NEXT for A10/A20/H3/H5/H6/A64 and Armada 3700, Rockchip, Meson, ... almost all supported board as a first or second kernel.
     
  21. Like
    esbeeb reacted to tkaiser in NanoPi Neo 2: GbE works in 4.14.y Armbian?   
    Count the patches and search for NEO2 there: https://github.com/armbian/build/tree/master/patch/kernel/sunxi-next
  22. Like
    esbeeb reacted to TonyMac32 in Have "Supported" boards been "Torture-Tested" for storage/disk-IO?   
    https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16812200061
     
  23. Like
    esbeeb reacted to devman in Have "Supported" boards been "Torture-Tested" for storage/disk-IO?   
    Umm.. the Helios4 kits (full or just the board) come with all the necessary cables.  SATA power, SATA data and AC adapter.   The only thing you need to source yourself is the drives.
  24. Like
    esbeeb reacted to hjc in Have "Supported" boards been "Torture-Tested" for storage/disk-IO?   
    Actually the 4.4 kernel is quite stable, however Armbian development on this board is still in early stages, so it's marked as WIP. It means many optimizations may have not been applied yet (e.g. interrupts), and many configurations may be changed later (e.g. board family change requires a manual upgrade). If you are an experienced Linux user, this may not be a problem.
     
    There are a few other boards with fast native SATA or capable of PCIe SATA supported by Armbian, e.g. Helios4, EspressoBin, Clearfog Pro.
  25. Like
    esbeeb reacted to jbw in Looking for an enclosure for espressobin   
    I'm definitely interested!  I'll be watching this thread in hopes this becomes real.