Support of Raspberry Pi


MathiasRenner
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Hi Igor,

 

[No apologies necessary for your non-native English. My partner speaks English as a second language but her English is a lot better than my Japanese. I'm the one who has to apologise when we travel.]

 

I agree that Broadcom has a business model that benefits from sales of the Raspberry Pi. The Pi wouldn't exist without that, nor would the community, nor would the ecosystem of vendors around the Pi, some who create really cool stuff, innovations over chips and hardware that they make accessible through carrier boards and supporting software libraries (like Adafruit, Pimoroni, etc.). They're also a business and need to survive and thrive, and like Canonical rely upon the free contributions of their users as well as years and years and layers upon layers of the product of hundreds of open source communities. I'm not an apologist for this arrangement, but I see that at least it works pretty well compared with whatever might be the alternative, which would be an entirely closed model like Apple, who a lot of people love for some reason (very clever marketing and nice-looking, expensive hardware?). I'd hardly call myself an avid capitalist, and I've (like I'm sure you) put in thousands of hours of my life into community endeavours. Sometimes I got sponsored to do it by whoever I was working for, but most of the time not. I don't think many people have any idea how much effort even a small project takes to bring to fruition, or maintain it.

 

On the other hand, expressing anger over the situation with Broadcom or the Raspberry Pi Foundation shouldn't extend to the community of users of those products. They're just people, sometimes children, sometimes students, sometimes hobbyists (beginners to seasoned veterans), sometimes professionals (beginners to seasoned veterans). All sorts of levels of experience with hardware and software, all sorts of levels of experience in communicating in a healthy way within a community. As I said to NicoD, grouping people together and treating them badly because they are women, black, gay, or Raspberry Pi users, is all the same. People are individuals, and some just need a bit of gentle training in how to behave in a community. I find this especially true of younger people who've grown up with their primary social experience being staring into a cell phone. Bad social interactions have real costs: to the recipient, to the person acting badly, and certainly to the community. It's in everyone's best interests to try to smooth that out if possible, and if after trying to explain to someone what are appropriate expectations or behaviour (maybe point them to a web page) they don't behave, then sure, by all means tell them to leave. I do understand the time constraints of trying to be nice, but I can only say it probably takes more time to argue with someone than to explain that they should stop yelling and instead offer to help the community if they want help. In my day job I sometimes deal with people who are under a great deal of stress and that is sometimes erupt right at me -- I have to remember it's (usually) not me they're really angry with.

 

In any case, thank you for replying. I've managed to 'do-release-upgrade' the Armbian on my Orange Pi and things look nice and stable (logs are clean, etc.), so I won't abandon it and go back to the Ubuntu I'd built on a different SD card. The Armbian experience was better and smoother than Ubuntu on the Orange Pi.

 

Thanks very much to you and your community's efforts.

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Armbian is a community driven open source project. Do you like to contribute your code?

1 hour ago, Louis said:

The Orange Pi power consumption is almost twice that of a Pi 4 and runs a lot hotter

 

Not too surprising with the OPI4's SoC, it's known for requiring a large heatsink.   You still have some options that might get temps and consumption  a little more under control.   From the armbian-config tool you can make adjustments to the CPU frequency governor.    From there you can set min and max frequency ranges, and pick an alternative governor.   My personal preference is the schedutil governor.  It's responsive, but more granular in adjustment than the on-demand governor.

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10 minutes ago, lanefu said:

Not too surprising with the OPI4's SoC, it's known for requiring a large heatsink.   You still have some options that might get temps and consumption  a little more under control.   From the armbian-config tool you can make adjustments to the CPU frequency governor.    From there you can set min and max frequency ranges, and pick an alternative governor.   My personal preference is the schedutil governor.  It's responsive, but more granular in adjustment than the on-demand governor.

Hi lanefu,

 

The heatsink I'm currently using is clearly not big enough. I'm still evaluating whether or not using the Orange Pi is really beneficial for this particular usage as I'm not using the SPR2801S NPU and as my code is in Python I'm not really able to take advantage of the six cores anyway -- coming from a Java background I was sad to see that Python's threading looks just like Java's but doesn't act much like Java's.

 

My current solution is simply a Python class that powers up a cooling fan if the temperature goes over a configured threshold. The tiny brushless fans I got from AliExpress sell for under a dollar, and for the Orange Pi I'd use a heatsink-mounted fan that sells for $1.69 which is double-sided tape mounted right on top of the RK3399. So rather than throttle the CPU I'd just cool it. But thanks, I'm happy to check out the frequency governor, sounds like a good tool to have in my kit. A lot of designing and building robots is trying parts of the system out separately, then realising that firing up everything at once things start to break.

 

I hadn't really looked into the armbian-config that much yet so thanks for the tip.

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On 3/18/2021 at 3:20 PM, Igor said:

Closed hardware is like a cancer, a slap toward Linux community. IMO, there lies another big part for this conflict. And the reason why bad words has been used.

 

This is why I personally have disdain for RPi / Broadcom.  IMO companies who are riding the current wave of popularity of "open source", whilst being actually nothing of the sort, I just find obnoxious (and actually, sociopathic, even).

 

I also don't like that RPi seem to have become synonymous with SBC, in the mind of many casual users.  You hear RPi being mentioned all the time on the broader Internet (I don't think we should be giving such mindshare / free advertising to such a closed platform).

 

So to me it was actually like a breath of fresh air to find this community, where people weren't "drinking the Kool-Aid" so to speak.

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