Ucino

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  1. Like
    Ucino reacted to Moklev in Motioneye (OPI)   
    Yes, for CSI camera you must stay on legacy (Jessie dafault).
    CSI on mainline is on WIP stage.
    Main difference is Motion 3.2.12 (instead of 4.01). Next kernel 4.14.18 is more stable than 3.x (uptime: weeks vs few days). On Jessie may need "deb multimedia" packages for a recent ffmpeg version.
    I recommend you a good USB camera H264/MJPEG capable.
  2. Like
    Ucino reacted to Moklev in Motioneye (OPI)   
    With Motioneye use ONLY Debian server/headless, best with cabled ethernet. With wifi the performance is reduced.
    My setup is: Orange Pi Zero (512MB) with Armbian 5.41/Debian Stretch 4.14.18 (next), MotionEye 0.38.1 and Motion 4.01.
    Use H264 for maximum performance and MJPEG for maximum quality.
  3. Like
    Ucino reacted to martinayotte in Install from SD to emmc   
    The first one ! u-boot AND rootfs from eMMC.
    ( the second means u-boot only on eMMC and rootfs on SATA/USB )
     
  4. Like
    Ucino reacted to chwe in Motioneye (OPI)   
    I think this is mostly related to this stuff here...
    http://www.lavrsen.dk/foswiki/bin/view/Motion/ConfigOptionFfmpegVideoCodec
     
    There's a lot of enhancement for the cameradriver and I think @@lex did some stuff there and maybe you get better performance with the cedrus ffmpeg stuff..
     
    I never paid that much attention to see if this can help for motion... 
  5. Like
    Ucino reacted to Moklev in Motioneye (OPI)   
    With an ELP 2mpx usb camera you can stream at 30+ fps, with streaming only and motion process disabled.
    Motion's slow dog process is a problem, you require an i5 cpu for a reasonable performance. With a little OPZ @1GHz Motioneye (Motion 4.01) runs at 15fps/720p but drop below 6-7fps if an event starts saving an image sequence (ca. 10 jpeg images).
  6. Like
    Ucino reacted to chwe in Motioneye (OPI)   
    http://linux-sunxi.org/Mainlining_Effort#Status_Matrix
    As it can be seen here...  
     
    There is progress in mainlining the camera interface see here (mostly for the V3s):
    https://groups.google.com/forum/#!forum/linux-sunxi
     
    It's not trivial and might need a lot of work before we see a mainlined CSI interface. 
     
    Do you get acceptable framerates with a USB webcam with motionEye? I only played a bit with it months ago and I had terrible slow framerates (6-7 fps).. To be honest, I used the cheapest usb cam from Aliexpress and never paid attention if this was a camera or settings related issue.
  7. Like
    Ucino reacted to Moklev in Motioneye (OPI)   
    You don't need a new guide. Motion 4.1.1 isn't available on Armbian, Mr Dave's build is only for Raspbian.
     
    On Armbian (i.e. Orange Pi Zero) download new Stretch build 5.38 next, mainline 4.14.14. Do not use Ubuntu.
     
    Follow original installation guideline:
    https://github.com/ccrisan/motioneye/wiki/Install-On-Debian
    (For Debian Stretch)
     
    BEFORE point 4 install pip dependencies:
    sudo pip install wheel
    sudo pip install setuptools
    sudo apt-get install zlibc zlib-gst zlib1g-dev
     
    Continue to point 4...
    ... at the end of installation point to [yourip]:8765 and configure it.
     
    et voilà! :-)
     
    Now Motioneye 0.38 run on motion 4.01.
    New motion version is usefull for new cam h264/rtsp based.
     

     
    With little OPZ performance is quite respectable:
    15fps (streaming) / 10 fps (analisys and capture) with a HD stream 1280x720px, H264 900 kbit/s
    12fps (streaming) / 7 fps (analisys and capture) with a HD stream 1280x720px, mjpeg 2,5 mbit/s
    Load:  1.94  1.24  0.53
    Temp: 70 °C
    (without hardware acceleration...)
     
     
    Mk
  8. Like
    Ucino reacted to RagnerBG in VLC Issue   
    The only thing i can guess is that mplayer is using internal ffmpeg, or what is present in Armbian, or self mencoder (at least if it's build from source), while mpv have it's own ffmpeg (again - at lest if it's build from source). Maybe if you start mpv in fullscreen with command line argument (or in conf file), this a/v desynchronisation will be gone. I had this problem before, with framebuffer version of Mali driver and this solved it. But Armbian now using X11 version, i think. Maybe there is a bug in newer versions of binaries (mali, libvdpau-sunxi). I would try to compile everything from source, including mpv, mplayer, vlc (good luck with that) and not install from repos. About vlc, i am surprised it even worked (sort of) with libvdpau-sunxi, without compilation from source. It wasn't before.
  9. Like
    Ucino reacted to Igor in [Solved] How to have bluetooth working on OrangePi PC+ on ubuntu desktop legacy ?   
    Open hardware won't exists since Bluetooth is a closed protocol. Check download page. On the bottom, there are links to tested equipment.
  10. Like
    Ucino reacted to tkaiser in [Solved] How to have bluetooth working on OrangePi PC+ on ubuntu desktop legacy ?   
    There is no such thing and according to lsusb you also don't use an USB BT dongle.
  11. Like
    Ucino reacted to Igor in [Solved] How to have bluetooth working on OrangePi PC+ on ubuntu desktop legacy ?   
    I just made self-build image with those fixes https://github.com/armbian/build/commit/ad3e331cef5374941c6317412470d5e145607d73 and Bluetooth is up and ready by default with such dongle. Opi PC+ legacy Ubuntu desktop http://sprunge.us/aJAc
  12. Like
    Ucino got a reaction from manuti in Which card choose to deploy an educational open source OS in schools ?   
    I have received it. It works for screen with HDMI to VGA adaptator on 1024x768 60Hz, that's very cool
    I will continue the tests, I have some problems for other things (wifi, bluetooth...).
  13. Like
    Ucino reacted to Igor in [solved] How can we have on board WiFi working with Orange PiPC+   
    Use armbian-config, switch to beta builds and conduct update. Then try to connect within armbian-config. It must work and forget about 3rd party manuals. They might be misleading.
     
    For some strange reason, I can't see logs. I am getting "Over Quota This application is temporarily over its serving quota. Please try again later."
     
    Wifi 100% works on this board, but you must download a correct image. Image for PC is not the same as for PC+ (wifi version).
  14. Like
    Ucino reacted to chwe in Which card choose to deploy an educational open source OS in schools ?   
    Hmm your 'wishlist' isn't that small.  To my knowledge there's no 'modern' SBC with open source GPU drivers. I think, you have to live with it. Most of these boards have a Mali GPU, so legacy instead of mainline seems to be a better choice for your use case. 
    My personal favourite would be the Orange Pi PC Plus for these reasons:
    You get it for ~35$ with a case and barrel plug powersource (3 Amp @ 5V). It have 3 native USB plus the otg micro USB. So you solve two problems at once.  Firstly you can be sure that no one uses a not appropriate micro usb cable for mobile phone charger to power this board and you have the otg still available if you need it somehow. armbian runs smoothly on it to my knowledge there's no big issue with this board. Maybe someone like @martinayotte can give you more insights cause he owns more than one. I don't know how good it is with your 3D stuff cause mine run as a headless server and I never tried it (don't have any HDMI monitor free to test these things ).  Maybe you have to buy one first for evaluation before you decide if it's a good board for these stuff or look at google if somebody did these. There's a connection for cameras and there are cameras available on their aliexpress online store (~6$). There's an onboard 'sound card', if you don't do really fancy stuff this one should work, so you don't need any USB sound cards (to be honest, I never tested mine). 8GB onboard eMMC, so you don't have to buy a reliable SD-Card for each board. Buy one for each class, with everything installed and configured, run nand-sata-install before give the SBC to the kids and let them play with it. If they damage something on software side, you can simply insert your "back up" SD-Card and re-run nand-sata-install again and they can start do brick it again.   Most of these arduinos and other small 'thingies' can be programmed via serial. There's one on your pin header so you would save one USB.  IR receiver and microphone on board. So two more things to play around for the kids.   As you can read in various threads here, all these cheap SBC haven't that an exciting wifi performance. To my knowledge the wifi chip on the OPI plus PC isn't the worst one soldered on such a board. 
  15. Like
    Ucino reacted to martinayotte in Which card choose to deploy an educational open source OS in schools ?   
    Yes, The OPiPC+ is one of my favorite, one of the reason is price/feature ratio, having eMMC is really nice.
    I'm also using those in my daily job.
    But, all my boards are headless, so I can't give hint about 3D stuff.
     
     
  16. Like
    Ucino reacted to Lion Wang in Evaluation of Banana Pi M2+ for an open source and open hardware project in school   
    1,BPI-M2+ ,just HDMI , you need use HDMI to VGA accessories line to let it support VGA.  Just BPI-M1 with VGA and HDMI port.
     
    2,about H2+,H3,H5 chip , all is PIN to PIN compatibility, to support your project ,more support is about software support.
     
    3,this is open source project ,you can get all design documents. we can support you.
     
    4, armbian have do a good work for support allwinner H3 chip.:)
     
     
     
     
     
  17. Like
    Ucino reacted to Igor in Evaluation of Banana Pi M2+ for an open source and open hardware project in school   
    Yes. I use one of those as my primary test device. With cheap HDMI 2 VGA converter. All mentioned boards and kernels which run Armbian support this screen. 

    Get one H3 board, use the legacy kernel and check how can you make use of boards 3D engine (MALI) in the software you are planning to use. Note that those boards use some simple 3D graphics and some hack might be needed like open GL wrapper ... in any case, your best and only way is to proceed with some H3 board. More or less all are supported on Armbian, just go for the one that suits your need best. In term on peripherals and physical dimensions.

    If you need 3D engine, forget about mainline kernel and more powerful boards. Software support is the key element. Bad or not existing ... you waste your time.
  18. Like
    Ucino reacted to tkaiser in H3 board buyer's guide   
    H2+/H3/H5 boards overview (2017/03 update)
     
    Since it has been a while since this topic has been updated and a lot of new boards have been released in the meantime it's time for a new overview.
     
    I'll add also H2+ and H5 based boards since in the meantime we learned that those SoCs are pin-to-pin compatible and recently vendors started to simply exchange H3 with H5 on some PCB (and vice versa in at least one occurence). From a software point of view H5 is quite different (using 64-bit Cortex-A53 CPU cores and ARMv8 instruction set, some early boot stages are also totally different compared to Cortex-A7/ARMv7 used in H3 and H2+) and it should also be noted that Armbian currently only provides OS images based on mainline kernel for H5 boards (so please forget about HW accelerated video decoding or 3D for now or maybe ever since none of the developers is in the mood to deal with Allwinner's BSP/legacy kernel for H5 (regarding 'BSP' just look above in post #2).
     
    While software support for H5 is currently somewhat different hardware features are pretty much the same as with H3 (still 3 to 4 real USB2 host ports and one USB2 OTG port: a simple register setting can switch the Micro USB port's PHY between the so called 'musb' controller used for OTG and a real EHCI/OHCI controller pair: with mainline kernel it will soon be possible to switch OTG to a real 4th USB2 host port with full feature set that still has not to share bandwidth with any of the other USB ports).
     
    CPU performance with H5 compared to H3 is slightly higher at the same clockspeed but some workloads that benefit from either 64-bit or ARMv8 instruction set are significantly faster (eg. software making use of NEON instructions might perform almost twice as fast and the best example is the stupid 'sysbench' CPU pseudo benchmark which shows over 10 times better scores on the same hardware when compiled with ARMv8 settings).
     
    In the following list I will also introduce some subjective 'categories' to deal better with the huge amount of boards we can use in the meantime:
    NAS category: these are the H3/H5 boards with Gigabit Ethernet IoT category: these are the small and cheap boards best suited for low consumption 'General purpose' category: all the other H3 devices, these are also those you should look for if you want a cheap device to run with X11, OpenELEC, RetrOrangePi or Lakka since they all feature HDMI and full legacy kernel support As already said the differentiation is subjective and partially misleading since new boards like NanoPi NEO 2 featuring Gigabit Ethernet are also that inexpensive, small and energy efficient that they could serve both as NAS and IoT nodes (actually you can somewhat control behaviour since GbE vs. Fast Ethernet makes a pretty huge difference in consumption so it's up to you). Boards that might fit in multiple categories are listed more than once to make comparisons more simple if you're only interested in a specific device category:
     
    NAS category (only due to Gigabit Ethernet available):
    Banana Pi M2+: H3, 1GB DRAM, 8GB slow eMMC, 1+2 USB ports useable, Wi-Fi/BT Banana Pi M2+ EDU: H3, 512MB DRAM, no eMMC, 1+2 USB ports useable NanoPi M1 Plus: H3, 1GB DRAM, 8GB slow eMMC, 1+3 USB ports useable, Wi-Fi/BT NanoPi M1 Plus 2: H5, 1GB DRAM, 8GB slow eMMC, 1+3 USB ports useable, Wi-Fi/BT NanoPi NEO 2: H5, 512MB DRAM, no eMMC, 1+1+2 USB ports useable NanoPi NEO Plus 2: H5, 512MB DRAM, no eMMC, 1+2+2 USB ports useable, Wi-Fi OrangePi PC 2: H5, 1GB DRAM, no eMMC, 1+3 USB ports useable OrangePi PC Prime: H5, 2GB DRAM, 1+3 USB ports useable, Wi-Fi/BT OrangePi Plus: H3, 1GB DRAM, 8GB eMMC, 1+4 USB ports useable (hub), Wi-Fi OrangePi Plus 2: H3, 2GB DRAM, 16GB fast eMMC, 1+4 USB ports useable (hub), Wi-Fi OrangePi Plus 2E: H3, 2GB DRAM, 16GB fast eMMC, 1+3 USB ports useable, Wi-Fi IoT category (cheap, small, energy efficient, most of them headless):
    NanoPi Air: H3, 512MB DRAM, 8GB slow eMMC, 1+1+2 USB ports useable, Wi-Fi/BT, no Ethernet NanoPi NEO: H3, 256/512MB DRAM, no eMMC, 1+1+2 USB ports useable, Fast Ethernet NanoPi NEO 2: H5, 512MB DRAM, no eMMC, 1+1+2 USB ports useable, Gigabit Ethernet NanoPi NEO Plus 2: H5, 512MB DRAM, no eMMC, 1+1+2 USB ports useable, Wi-Fi, Gigabit Ethernet OrangePi Zero: H2+, 256/512MB DRAM, no eMMC, 1+1+2 USB ports useable, Wi-Fi, Fast Ethernet OrangePi Zero Plus 2: H3, 512MB DRAM, 8GB fast eMMC, 1+0+2 USB ports useable, Wi-Fi/BT, no Ethernet but HDMI OrangePi Zero Plus 2: H5, 512MB DRAM, 8GB fast eMMC, 1+0+2 USB ports useable, Wi-Fi/BT, no Ethernet but HDMI General purpose (HDMI and full legacy kernel support: video/3D HW accelerated):
    Beelink X2: H3, 1GB DRAM, 8GB slow eMMC, 1+1 USB ports useable, Wi-Fi, Fast Ethernet NanoPi M1: H3, 1GB DRAM, no eMMC, 1+3 USB ports useable, Fast Ethernet OrangePi Lite: H3, 512MB DRAM, no eMMC, 1+2 USB ports useable, Wi-Fi, no Ethernet OrangePi One: H3, 512MB DRAM, no eMMC, 1+1 USB ports useable, Fast Ethernet OrangePi PC: H3, 1GB DRAM, no eMMC, 1+3 USB ports useable, Fast Ethernet OrangePi PC Plus: H3, 1GB DRAM, 8GB fast eMMC, 1+3 USB ports useable, Wi-Fi, Fast Ethernet OrangePi Zero Plus 2: H3, 512MB DRAM, 8GB fast eMMC, 1+1+2 USB ports useable, Wi-Fi/BT, no Ethernet pcDuino Nano 4: See above, it's just an OEM version of NanoPi M1 done for Linksprite Some important notes:
    The following boards are listed in more than 1 category due to advanced feature mix: NanoPi NEO 2, NanoPi NEO Plus 2 and OrangePi Zero Plus 2 H3/H5 CE/FCC certifications: Please check individually and don't trust in logos silkscreened on the PCB, even if it looks like 'CE' it might mean 'China Export' instead IO bandwidth: H2+/H3/H5 SoC features 3+1 USB2 ports but on a few boards an internal USB hub is used so while these expose more USB receptacles some ports have to share bandwidth. Also on these boards a buggy/slow GL830 USB-to-SATA bridge is used. Search for 'hub' above to identify them. eMMC: shows most of the times higher random IO performance compared to 'the average SD card', but some vendors use pretty slow eMMC on their boards (Xunlong being the exception with OPi PC Plus, Plus, Plus 2, Plus 2E and Zero Plus 2). Please do not overestimate eMMC -- there's no need to choose crappy/slow SD cards and if you follow the usual recommendations difference in performance varies not that much (for example eMMC on most boards shows pretty low sequential write speeds that will be easily outperformed by any good SD card and differences in random IO don't have to be that huge, simply watch out for SD cards showing A1 or even A2 logo) USB ports: Some of the IoT devices have two of the SoC's USB host ports available on a pin header to be used with soldering or combined with various Docks, HATs or 'Expansion boards' (search for '1+1+2' above). On OPi One/Lite the unexposed USB host ports are available at pretty tiny solder pads so only usable with a lot of soldering experience Wi-Fi/BT: all boards providing both Wi-Fi and BT rely on Ampak's AP6212 so performance is identical, the Wi-Fi only boards either rely on RTL8189ETV/8189FTV (slightly better Wi-Fi performance than AP6212) or Allwinner's XR819 (so expect low Wi-Fi performance with OPi Zero or NEO Plus 2 since implementation is low-end and currently driver sucks) Yeah, each vendor's naming scheme totally sucks. Partially there are rules involved (the 'Plus' then means eMMC with Xunlong or GBit Ethernet with FriendlyELEC... mostly) but please don't trust in and check always individually!  
    And now another few words on a different technical detail affecting both performance and thermal behaviour of the various boards: Voltage regulation / DVFS. TL;DR: the SoC can be fed with a variable voltage (VDD_CPUX), the lower the voltage the lower the temperature (less problems with heat/overheating), the higher the voltage the higher the maximum CPU clockspeed. So the best idea is to adjust this dynamically (low voltage/clockspeed when idle and only increasing both when needed). There are 3 variants to implement this: not at all, primitive or advanced (using a voltage regulator that's able to adjust VDD_CPUX in 20mV steps)
    Only 3 devices implement no voltage regulation at all: Banana Pi M2+/EDU (frying the SoC constantly at 1.3V therefore prone to overheating), Beelink X2 (no idea) and NEO 2 (only 1.1V therefore limited to 1008MHz cpufreq max since above instabilities might occur).  Some boards use SY8106A I2C accessible voltage regulator where we can use fine grained voltage settings (Armbian fine-tuned these for every board so far to achieve max performance). This applies only to the following Xunlong boards: OPi PC, PC Plus, PC 2, PC 3, Plus, Plus 2 and Plus 2E. All other boards implement a simple two voltage scheme and are able to switch between 1.1V (up to 912MHz possible with H2+/H3 or 1008MHz with H5) or 1.3V (1.2GHz max with H2+/H3 and 1.25GHz with H5) And finally to add some stupid rankings: the cheapest board is from Xunlong (Orange Pi Zero: $7), the fastest is from Xunlong (Orange Pi PC 2 for $20) and the one with best feature set and onboard peripherals is also from Xunlong (Orange Pi Plus 2E: $35). And that's only due to OrangePi PC 3 Prime still not being released at the time of this writing (since otherwise regarding both performance and features this specific Xunlong board... )
     
    Hope that helps
     
    Edit: OPi 3 is now known as OPi Prime and (almost) nothing has changed compared to the leaked pictures back from last August.