pzw

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  1. Like
    pzw got a reaction from NicoD in Looking for recommendation. 3/4x USB   
    @NicoD; Thanks for all the info. I think I made the decision to go for the M4. 
  2. Like
    pzw reacted to NicoD in Looking for recommendation. 3/4x USB   
    Hi. You seem to have done your homework well. Those are indeed all the most powerful boards.
    But other needs are important too. Like how much ram do you need, is power efficiency an issue? Does your task scale well over multiple cores? What voltage do you want it to use?
     
    For example when ram isn't that important you could go for the smaller NanoPi NEO4 with the same Soc as the M4, but only 1GB ram. But good cooling is needed with that.
    The NEO3 is even a bit more powerful with 8 cores of 1.4Ghz. But single core performance is a lot worse. Power consumption is then again better than the RK3399's. There's also the NanoPC T3+ with that SoC, but a bigger footprint and 2GB ram.
    The Odroid N2 is the most powerful of all in CPU power. It does need a higher voltage than the others. It's very new and not super stable yet. But I've tried a new Armbian image today on it and it seems to be better than anything else for it. Too early to know.

    The H6's are pretty powerful for a quad-core sbc. Also very new and software isn't ready. It needs sufficient cooling to get the most out of it, but it's doable. I see the PineH64 model b becomming a good board. but that has 2.4Ghz wifi vs 5Ghz wifi of the Orange Pi3.

    I've got most of those boards. And the overall best board is the NanoPi M4 for me. Very fast, stable, good Armbian software, great connectivity. It does consume the most of all when maxed out.
    Or the Odroid XU4 is also a very powerful board, octa-core. But hard to cool.
    I hope that helps.
  3. Like
    pzw reacted to NicoD in Looking for recommendation. 3/4x USB   
    For some tasks the T3+ is faster. But only tasks that scale well over multiple cores like Blender. Most applications don't do that well and prefere a better single core performance. I indeed menth the Fire3. Too many names. That should be the most powerful for a low price, but indeed not much usb ports.

    You mentioned the Atomic Pi. Could be a valible option. It's cheap, x86 and very fast for that price.

    I once made a list of benchmarks of most of my sbc's. It is confusing since there ain't no perfect benchmark tools(and I wanted to show discrepencies). But it gives an idea of what you can expect.
    7 zip, single core scores are important(small core-big core). Multi-core doesn't give exact results(not 100% se). Igrnore gtkperf, gimp and sysbench. I only used that to show it was useless.
    The H3 performs a bit worse than the Rock64 at 1.3Ghz. I should have added one, I've got enough of them but don't like them much except for light data server.

    You can  perform the 7-zip tests yourself on the H3. Install p7zip-full, then
    7z b   (multicore test)
    sudo taskset c 0 7z b (single core)
    I only use decompression numbers since I do not want to mix compression with decompression and get a number of nothing.

    I also still think the M4 is the best choice. The only sbc that never had issues, and I use it daily.
     
  4. Like
    pzw reacted to NicoD in NanoPi Duo2 support?   
    @pzwI also got one of those. I haven't tried any armbian on it. I did use images for the M1+ from FriendlyElec because they were better.
    Maybe the one from Armbian works.
    https://www.armbian.com/nanopi-m1-plus/
    It is end of support. But could be a good base to build upon.

    I should pick it up again and try. I made a wifi cam with a small powerbank. But I'm not happy of the camera. Picture isn't stable.
  5. Like
    pzw reacted to martinayotte in NanoPi Duo2 support?   
    That is normal that your modifications are not loaded because the *.dto is not the normal filename extention : Main DT should be *.dtb and overlays are *.dtbo
     
  6. Like
    pzw got a reaction from NicoD in NanoPi Duo2 support?   
    Hi @NicoD ; Looks like a good start for sure.  I also consider a learning project for me, since I would like to learn more about how the kernel etc works, so I can make the needed overlays where needed...  But for now I need to make sure they are loading! (Pretty critical step in the process!)
  7. Like
    pzw reacted to TonyMac32 in Need some info on nanopi duo   
    Verify 110 ohms here, powered on no shield.
  8. Like
    pzw reacted to guidol in Need some info on nanopi duo   
    between Pin 13 & 14 the ohm-meter doesnt show a reaction - like there is no connection between these two pins.
    Did try also both directions (+/-)
    NO zero Ohm and NO 100 Ohm
     
  9. Like
    pzw reacted to guidol in Need some info on nanopi duo   
    no
     
    [EDIT] with power via MicroUSB there are 105-120 Ohm - ALL measured without the base, BUT the picture for finding the right pins....with heatsink I couldnt read at the top of the Duo


  10. Like
    pzw reacted to TonyMac32 in Which SPI TFT display controller?   
    Resolution is your enemy, it will have to be a very chunky looking display or an extremely slow refresh rate.
     
    @Larry Bank, you've more time invested in this arena, your thoughts?
  11. Like
    pzw got a reaction from devman in Beginner asks: How to power small LEDs from the OPi Zero   
    Since LEDs are current devices,  they cannot be easily controlled in the voltage domain. So if you do not want to do pwm control, then you need to do current control.  PWM control is a lot easier!
    You need to use a driver circuit to control your LEDs.  That can be as simple as a uln2803 chip, or a complicated current limiting discrete circuit.
    First figure out what the voltage is you need to control, and the total amount of current. Then we might be able to help.
  12. Like
    pzw got a reaction from willmore in Beginner asks: How to power small LEDs from the OPi Zero   
    Since LEDs are current devices,  they cannot be easily controlled in the voltage domain. So if you do not want to do pwm control, then you need to do current control.  PWM control is a lot easier!
    You need to use a driver circuit to control your LEDs.  That can be as simple as a uln2803 chip, or a complicated current limiting discrete circuit.
    First figure out what the voltage is you need to control, and the total amount of current. Then we might be able to help.
  13. Like
    pzw got a reaction from lottiewq69 in microphone not working on Orange Pi Zero   
    Which diagram are you using at the moment?
    Are you sure the Mic is correctly connected? (+ and -)
  14. Like
    pzw got a reaction from Tido in Improve 'Support over Forum' situation   
    I used to be a moderator on a big, >30000 members of which about 1500 active, satellite reception related forum in the Netherlands and we found out back then that it did work. Another modification we made was showing a reminder above the text box where the new topic was started... 
    If the tag is just the SBC, and all SBC tags have the same color, the christmas tree might not be so bad...
     
    Another suggestion; Would it be possible to create per forum a FAQ sticky post, where a lot of the current stickies are mentioned in...? So reduce the number of sticky posts..
     
    On the support side it might be good to only support the last 2/3 releases of Armbian, and if somebody asks anything about an older release then they just get the advice to update to be able to get support...
     
    Just a few random thoughts..
  15. Like
    pzw got a reaction from Tido in Improve 'Support over Forum' situation   
    Would it be an option to introduce mandatory tags for the subjects?  I am thinking of creating a tag for each SBC which is allowed in the forum section, and possibly a "General" tag for issues with all SBCs...  This would maybe force the topic starter to think about the location of the post; if the tag is not available you are in the wrong section. On top of that it would make it a lot easier to filter / search the forum...
  16. Like
    pzw got a reaction from lanefu in Improve 'Support over Forum' situation   
    I used to be a moderator on a big, >30000 members of which about 1500 active, satellite reception related forum in the Netherlands and we found out back then that it did work. Another modification we made was showing a reminder above the text box where the new topic was started... 
    If the tag is just the SBC, and all SBC tags have the same color, the christmas tree might not be so bad...
     
    Another suggestion; Would it be possible to create per forum a FAQ sticky post, where a lot of the current stickies are mentioned in...? So reduce the number of sticky posts..
     
    On the support side it might be good to only support the last 2/3 releases of Armbian, and if somebody asks anything about an older release then they just get the advice to update to be able to get support...
     
    Just a few random thoughts..
  17. Like
    pzw got a reaction from tkaiser in Random thoughts, opinions and well known facts about PCB and heatsinks   
    The thermal pad which you can put in between the SoC and heatsink will take care of the heat transfer. You can always opt to put a copper shim instead. Then pointing the heatsink upwards with the pin header soldered on that side too you have access to everything you need... 
    Therefore in my opinion it is not a pointless board, and I do think the design is actually a well thought design (mechanically)...
  18. Like
    pzw got a reaction from tkaiser in FCC CE and certifications   
    If all the individual part are CE certified, and you have all certificates in hand, I think you can declare yourself that the complete unit is CE compliant. 
    However be extremely careful with assuming that the CE marking on a piece of electronics coming from China actually means that it is CE compliant, and is not an indication of "Chinese Export". 
    Stick to reliable suppliers, so no Aliexpress/Ebay etc, to get your parts. I would recommend Mouser/Farnell/Digikey/RS, and ensure you can get a copy of the certification. Then based on that, and your correct building/construction techniques can make a self declaration that the complete unit is CE compliant.
    I would strongly recommend looking at your local national standardisation body and/or IEC to make sure your construction is safe.
  19. Like
    pzw got a reaction from dottgonzo in FCC CE and certifications   
    Check:
     
    https://ec.europa.eu/growth/single-market/ce-marking_en
    https://cemarking.net/eu-ce-marking-directives/
    http://europa.eu/youreurope/business/product/ce-mark/index_en.htm
    http://www.ce-marking.org/index.html
     
    Don't forget the RoHS requirement!
  20. Like
    pzw got a reaction from tech9 in OrangePi Zero footprint files (schematic? .brd file?)   
    The footprint is the whole PCB, but not with the 1x13 pin header. So you have the outline and the mounting holes...
  21. Like
    pzw got a reaction from Theoretiker in NanoPI Neo V1 doesn't burn the 1A Fuse?   
    Maybe you should look up the protection curve of fuses. You'll see that a fuse needs time to blow when it's subjected to small overloads.
  22. Like
    pzw reacted to renaudrenaud in Orange Pi Zero dimensional (mechanical) drawing   
    Ok, so go to the website indicated and you have a tool to measure. I've tried it and the measure indicated are ok (I only use a ruler for the moment waiting for the electronic caliper in few days).
     
    If I do something on the CAD files, I will not use Autocad but freeware instead.
  23. Like
    pzw got a reaction from Theoretiker in NanoPI Neo V1 doesn't burn the 1A Fuse?   
    Look at building something using these:  http://www.ti.com/product/tps25924/description
  24. Like
    pzw got a reaction from Twosky2000 in Voltage Regulator 7805   
    Agree with zador. What you can try to do (if possible) is lower the voltage to 8-9V, instead of 12V. That will remove 1W of heat from the 7805. Also install a heatsink on the regulator, and do not forget to add a electrolytic capacitor of 220uF - 1000uF at the output of the regulator to take care of the current surges a SBC produces at times.
    Depending on the exact type of the 7805 you might run into the max. current handling capacity. The most common TO220 version is standard 1A max... There are 78M05 units, but those will require a heatsink for the much higher current.
    All in all is a 7805 a poor choice for your application. I would recommend looking at a switching regulator of i.e. Recom. Do not forget the additional capacitance on the output though...
  25. Like
    pzw got a reaction from emorysmith in Orangepi One wont connect ethernet unless through switch   
    Try "sudo ethtool -s eth0 speed 100 duplex full autoneg off" ...