sfx2000

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  1. Like
    sfx2000 got a reaction from Bernie_O in /tmp gets eventually full. How to purge it?   
    logrotate is one item to look at to close out logs and age them out.
     
    FWIW -  There's armbian specific services in systemd that you might want to actually disable - armbian-ramlog for example, as when it runs out of space it gets ugly.
    systemctl list-unit-files | grep armbian armbian-firstrun-config.service            enabled         armbian-firstrun.service                   disabled        armbian-hardware-monitor.service           enabled         armbian-hardware-optimize.service          enabled        armbian-ramlog.service                     disabled        armbian-resize-filesystem.service          disabled        armbian-zram-config.service                disabled  Anyways - the ram logging and ZRAM stuff tend to be problematic for some that come into Armbian from other platforms...
     
    The two services I would disable from SystemD are below:
    armbian-ramlog.service armbian-zram-config.service  
    I know folks might be offended here - but disabling this results in expected behavior.
     
     
  2. Like
    sfx2000 got a reaction from Igor in [Info] NanoPi Neo/Neo2-OLED-Hat does work with armbian   
    Spent some time to sort out things... not a kernel issue...
     
    ended up being that systemctl rc.local.service was exiting based on a bad entry in rc.local that was calling dnsmasq as a systemd resource, and it failed.
     
    Since the rc.local.service fails, oled-start doesn't run
     
    Don't ask me how dnsmasq service ever got into my rc.local, along with an iptables-restore entry - as I don't recall...
     
    Might have been when I was trying to help one of our forum members out with AP mode stuff...
     
    I've never been the biggest fan of systemd - it is things like this where one can get nested items that make it hard to troubleshoot. 
     
     
  3. Like
    sfx2000 reacted to guidol in [Info] NanoPi Neo/Neo2-OLED-Hat does work with armbian   
    Did you use the armbian-build-system for generating the image/kernel? :  https://github.com/armbian/build
    This can be done in a VirtualBox or a unused real PC.
    I think there you havent to activate much i2c stuff, but after booting activating i2c through the armbian-config and reboot.
     
    For myself I disconnected the OLED-Screen and did put the Neo2 now in the silver NAS-Case from FriendlyARM
    and connected a LCD2USB-Display which can be used with LCD4Linux e.g. like 
    USB port 1602 LCD Module for Pi (LCD2USB)
    https://www.friendlyarm.com/index.php?route=product/product&product_id=136
     


  4. Like
    sfx2000 got a reaction from qblueRed42 in Raspberry Pi 4 Released - From $35 USD   
    Interesting - some casual benchmarking of Pi4 vs Pi3...
     
    For virtualization - the new Broadcom SoC is a good step forward for the Pi Folks...
     
    A lot of this comes from how the new chip does interrupt handling.
     
    https://blog.cloudkernels.net/posts/rpi4-64bit-virt/
     
     
  5. Like
    sfx2000 got a reaction from Jens Bauer in SBC recommendations for a wireless router   
    One of the better SoC's for comms processing that is affordable is the Armada 8xxx series - I know of several folks that have converted Machiatto-Bin boards for ARM development workstations.
  6. Like
    sfx2000 got a reaction from Jens Bauer in Raspberry Pi 4 Released - From $35 USD   
    Interesting - some casual benchmarking of Pi4 vs Pi3...
     
    For virtualization - the new Broadcom SoC is a good step forward for the Pi Folks...
     
    A lot of this comes from how the new chip does interrupt handling.
     
    https://blog.cloudkernels.net/posts/rpi4-64bit-virt/
     
     
  7. Like
    sfx2000 got a reaction from TonyMac32 in Raspberry Pi 4 Released - From $35 USD   
    USB-C power is very specific on how to design a circuit - too many folks take shortcuts....Looks like the Pi folks did as well...
     
    https://medium.com/@leung.benson/how-to-design-a-proper-usb-c-power-sink-hint-not-the-way-raspberry-pi-4-did-it-f470d7a5910
     
    Any competent EE will see the issue at hand...
  8. Like
    sfx2000 reacted to TonyMac32 in Raspberry Pi 4 Released - From $35 USD   
    - 4 big cores on 28 nm, see the Tinker Board for a lesson in cooling that form factor.  (the Pi seems oddly underclocked, if I'm being honest, a 3288 will go 1.8 GHz, @wtarreau will tell you 2.0+)
     
    - As far as USB3/Gb, the tunnel-vision Pi people would have seen an insane improvement with just 4x USB2 on their own channels and a 100 Mb PHY.  So yes, they are going to think they're lighting the world on fire performance wise.
     
    - That USB-C does not appear to be intelligent PD type, so I'd be interested to see when people use smart supplies with it, if it will run on the 500 mA they'll probably limit to.  (correct me if I've gotten it mixed up)
     
    It looks more interesting than the Pi 3, I bought a few 3's and have since let them rot.  I still used a 2 until recently for music.
  9. Like
    sfx2000 got a reaction from Tido in Very Small Platforms - Rockchip 3308 and Allwinner V3s   
    Not quite accurate - 2G (GSM/GPRS) is a completely different radio access network, including waveforms and modulation scheme.
     
    2G was turned down some time back here in the US, and now the major operators have scheduled the 3G sunset in the next couple.
  10. Like
    sfx2000 got a reaction from qblueRed42 in SBC recommendations for a wireless router   
    espressoBIN is a decent choice - good performance at a decent price, and a community here on Armbian that can support it
     
    The ClearFogs are a step up, even though their on an older ARMv7A Armada - the 8K is newer and is ARMv8, but not sure where the BSP support is there.
     
    There's been a trio of QC-Atheros IPQ-40xx devices recently announced, and they have integrated 802.11ac dual band radios - but most of them are somewhat tight - e.g. to get best performance out of them, one has to use the QSDK, which is built on an older version of OpenWRT - there is support for some IPQ40xx in OpenWRT 18.06 and Master, but I'm not sure it's stable enough yet for daily-driver use on the WiFi (ath10k drivers are under heavy development, and there's issues with the Switch outside of typical setup - see DSA on this chip over on OpenWRT forums...)
     
    I was starting to develop a fairly open board based on AR9331/AR9531 - not ARM based, as these are MIPS cores, but the SOC is very well documented, and strong OpenWRT support, but that got set aside when work stepped up and my free time was reduced quite a bit.
  11. Like
    sfx2000 got a reaction from gstoyanov in SBC recommendations for a wireless router   
    espressoBIN is a decent choice - good performance at a decent price, and a community here on Armbian that can support it
     
    The ClearFogs are a step up, even though their on an older ARMv7A Armada - the 8K is newer and is ARMv8, but not sure where the BSP support is there.
     
    There's been a trio of QC-Atheros IPQ-40xx devices recently announced, and they have integrated 802.11ac dual band radios - but most of them are somewhat tight - e.g. to get best performance out of them, one has to use the QSDK, which is built on an older version of OpenWRT - there is support for some IPQ40xx in OpenWRT 18.06 and Master, but I'm not sure it's stable enough yet for daily-driver use on the WiFi (ath10k drivers are under heavy development, and there's issues with the Switch outside of typical setup - see DSA on this chip over on OpenWRT forums...)
     
    I was starting to develop a fairly open board based on AR9331/AR9531 - not ARM based, as these are MIPS cores, but the SOC is very well documented, and strong OpenWRT support, but that got set aside when work stepped up and my free time was reduced quite a bit.
  12. Like
    sfx2000 got a reaction from qblueRed42 in Raspberry Pi 4 Released - From $35 USD   
    I'll reserve opinions for now, other than it seems like a good step forward for the RPi team, and an appreciation for the amount of effort to basically tailor a chip for their product.
     
    But it seems like a nice device, and Pi has good community support, and they offer both HW and SW that works for their audience - so that's all good.
     
    Quick thoughts though...
     
    1) 4 big ARM cores - 28nm, so some thermal challenges as we know from other SoC vendors on this node
    2) VC6 - which is a big step from the BCM chips that Pi has used in the past
    3) Real USB3 - early reports is there is opportunity for Pi folks to improve some perf there
    4) Real 1Gb Ethernet - same here - driver work is likely going to improve performance
    5) Early reports are that the USB-C for power is also USB2 OTG - need to confirm
     
    Big step for them on the HW side, and moving to Buster for Raspbian is a bit bold, considering that Buster at the moment is still in testing upstream - Rasbian is still 32-bit, so I get that, and that's not a complaint, just an observation.
     
    That being said - It's still in many ways the same story - there's Open, and then there is Kinda Open - Pi's prior to Pi4B were in that Kinda Open realm with the odd bootloader and sequence there, along with it having a close source OS underlying it all running on the VC4 host.
     
    Busy with jobby-job stuff at the moment, so I'll let other run into the fire on Pi4B.
  13. Like
    sfx2000 reacted to ayaromenok in nvidia jetson nano   
    it's a good idea to use tegrastats utility(for logging) or top-looks jtop from Raffaello Bonghi - it's show CPU\GPU\total power consumption, frequency and load graph for GPU too(on second tab - press 2)
  14. Like
    sfx2000 got a reaction from NicoD in nvidia jetson nano   
    Blender on Jetson Nano as requested - with Cuda, there's no other boards other than nVidia
     
    Time 01:11:37.77 | Mem:140.48M, Peak 142.73M
     
    I would expect Shield TV Box to do better, along with more recent tegra's that support Pascal and later GPU's.
     
  15. Like
    sfx2000 reacted to TonyMac32 in nvidia jetson nano   
    Assuming you have good Dupont connectors, yes.
     
    I use a 5V 14 A chassis supply adjusted to 5.25 for my mess, I think I've got the right barrel jack on it.  Been reworking some floating ground pins on a TRRS jack... 
  16. Like
    sfx2000 got a reaction from NicoD in nvidia jetson nano   
    Hmmm... giving it a try...
     
    With the current L4T - looks like it's about an hour and a half - CPU load is pretty low so it's all GPU...
     
    Jetson - she be getting pretty warm there - for folks with MicroUSB, make sure you're in the low power model (nvpmodel=1)
     
    Anyways - under full power... work in progress... CPU load is actually pretty low, so my thoughts are that this is all running on the GPU itself, because CUDA...
     

  17. Like
    sfx2000 got a reaction from NicoD in nvidia jetson nano   
    Proper power - 5A/5VDC over the barrel... @tkaiser - opened an issue to report.
     
    https://github.com/ThomasKaiser/sbc-bench
     
    http://ix.io/1I4j
     
    Again, general compute is not where nVidia is focused on, but there, as a big ARM, it does ok...
  18. Like
    sfx2000 got a reaction from qblueRed42 in Announcement : Odroid N2   
    Normally with big.LITTLE, tasks migrate from the LITTLE core to the big core - much depends on the kernel scheduler in use, and whether that scheduler is aware of ARM MP in a big.LITTLE context - in any event, one does need to consider performance per core, and how to schedule tasks. Done right, it works pretty well, done wrong and one can get into contention conflicts between cache, main memory, and arbitration on who has control of the CCI at any given time.
     
    nVidia also has the 4 Cortex-A53's along with the 4 Cortex-A57's, but they don't expose the A53's directly to the kernel - management is done below the kernel in the hardware, which might make scheduling easier in the linux kernel.
     
    Worth reading - it's a few years old - https://www.arm.com/files/pdf/big_LITTLE_Technology_the_Futue_of_Mobile.pdf
     
    More recently, there's been a lot of work around energy aware scheduling, and ARM is one of the big players there - https://developer.arm.com/tools-and-software/open-source-software/linux-kernel/energy-aware-scheduling
     
    It's in Kernel 5.0, but perhaps some folks might consider back-porting it if they have the spare time to do so.
     
    Anyways - more cores doesn't mean faster - there's a limit there - and this is more of a systems engineering issue, along with SW... and this goes back to 1967 with Amdahl's presentation...
     
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amdahl's_law
     
    Much like Shannon with Information Theory and Wireless Communication - one can only put so many bits into a medium before it becomes error limited.
     
    Anyways - it's an interesting time where we're getting the big ARM cores in boards that are $100USD or lower - but it also starts to point out that we need to have better solutions to power these larger cores...
  19. Like
    sfx2000 got a reaction from NicoD in Announcement : Odroid N2   
    Anyways - would be fun to see a cage match between Nano Pi M4 vs. Odroid N2 vs nVidia Jetson Nano...
     
    Traditional benchmarks as well as some VPU/GPU work - as RK3399 has Mali T864 vs. Amlogic with G52 vs. nVidia with Maxwell
     
    Since all are supported in some way with Ubuntu 18.04LTS with Vendor supplied BSP's...
  20. Like
    sfx2000 got a reaction from NicoD in Announcement : Odroid N2   
    Would be interesting to see how it competes with Jetson Nano with a good power supply...
     
    Jetson has a fairly large heatsink, but it's generally cool to the touch right now with 2.5A over MicroUSB - 5 amp Power Supply is scheduled to arrive tomorrow, and then we can turn up the Jetson clocks and see what it can really do...
     
    (Jetson Nano under full load can easily consume 20w when doing GPU compute tasks - not too much different than Google Coral)
  21. Like
    sfx2000 got a reaction from qblueRed42 in Announcement : Odroid N2   
    Would be interesting to see how it competes with Jetson Nano with a good power supply...
     
    Jetson has a fairly large heatsink, but it's generally cool to the touch right now with 2.5A over MicroUSB - 5 amp Power Supply is scheduled to arrive tomorrow, and then we can turn up the Jetson clocks and see what it can really do...
     
    (Jetson Nano under full load can easily consume 20w when doing GPU compute tasks - not too much different than Google Coral)
  22. Like
    sfx2000 got a reaction from gounthar in nvidia jetson nano   
    It got here yesterday (4.26) - first glances...
     
    (Note - this is a big/LITTLE - the A53's are 'hidden' but they're present - to Linux, only the big A57's are shown - there's some shenanigans going on inside the chip for power management that is not exposed to the OS)
     
    1) When they say 5V 4A - they mean it - and it's best to power this device thru the barrel jack
    2) Can power via microUSB - and there, have a very, very, very good power supply - even then
    2a) powering thru the MicroUSB means that the Tegra is going to into a lower scale power domain - it adjusts the clocks according to not exceed 2A
    3) Display - Display Port to a monitor works, HDMI to a FullHD (1018P) works, HDMI to DVI adapters - strongly not recommended - I had an old one that was supplied with a Mac Mini 2010, and it kinda works
     
    Some tips - use a powered USB hub for Keyboard/Mouse if running from MicroUSB as depending on peripherals, including a WiFi adapter, takes away from that 2A power budget, and can cause stability issues.
     
    (on big chips like this where the board has a barrel jack - don't use MicroUSB)
     
    SD Card - use a quality UHS-1 or better card - I'm using a Samsung Pro Plus - which is a Class 10 UHS3 card, and it works fine.
     
    Info below - running from MicroUSB - I have a 5VDC 4A adapter on order...
     
     
     
     
     
    dmesg - bootup
     
     
  23. Like
    sfx2000 got a reaction from qblueRed42 in nvidia jetson nano   
    It got here yesterday (4.26) - first glances...
     
    (Note - this is a big/LITTLE - the A53's are 'hidden' but they're present - to Linux, only the big A57's are shown - there's some shenanigans going on inside the chip for power management that is not exposed to the OS)
     
    1) When they say 5V 4A - they mean it - and it's best to power this device thru the barrel jack
    2) Can power via microUSB - and there, have a very, very, very good power supply - even then
    2a) powering thru the MicroUSB means that the Tegra is going to into a lower scale power domain - it adjusts the clocks according to not exceed 2A
    3) Display - Display Port to a monitor works, HDMI to a FullHD (1018P) works, HDMI to DVI adapters - strongly not recommended - I had an old one that was supplied with a Mac Mini 2010, and it kinda works
     
    Some tips - use a powered USB hub for Keyboard/Mouse if running from MicroUSB as depending on peripherals, including a WiFi adapter, takes away from that 2A power budget, and can cause stability issues.
     
    (on big chips like this where the board has a barrel jack - don't use MicroUSB)
     
    SD Card - use a quality UHS-1 or better card - I'm using a Samsung Pro Plus - which is a Class 10 UHS3 card, and it works fine.
     
    Info below - running from MicroUSB - I have a 5VDC 4A adapter on order...
     
     
     
     
     
    dmesg - bootup
     
     
  24. Like
    sfx2000 got a reaction from gounthar in Which boards to get a VPN server and a VPN client?   
    But it works... wg is cool as CPU load is minimal, compared to the CPU intense OpenVPN -
     
    Enter MIPS24Kc, which would be comparable to ARM11 - Pre-ARM Cortex-A7... the other day, two clients attached, and CPU load was 3 percent, and that's with Stubby and WG active over a 4G mobile hotspot (USB-150 was WiFi to the phone as WAN, and routing from there to two WiFi clients)
     
    I suppose this is the difference between an Application focused SoC vs a Network focused platform.
     
    There's another thread where I chat a bit about MIPS - interesting arch there for networking stuff...
     
    Anyways - the openwrt repo's also support Tor, which may be of some interest to some...
  25. Like
    sfx2000 got a reaction from gounthar in Which boards to get a VPN server and a VPN client?   
    Something to consider...
     
    https://www.gl-inet.com/products/gl-usb150/
     
    MIPS based - but full OpenWRT/Linux under the hood - wireguard client/server and OpenVPN client/server - plug into the PC/Mac/Linux and it is an ethernet device, but not needed, just give it power and it'll run...
     
    If one is bent toward WiFi hacking, the SoC WiFi is ATH9K based, which is one of the better WiFi chips for documentation purposes...