Technicavolous

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  1. Like
    Technicavolous got a reaction from Igor in Why are armbian images not in a format that Etcher understands?   
    We were ... I had this marvelous trojan that could be sent over chat that would cause a little smiley face to bounce around the screen every time the control button got pressed. After a while there were several faces bouncing around the screen. If the victim hit the right shift all the faces would go in clockwise circles, and counter clockwise with the left ... after a while it got too cluttered so all the faces would just 'drip' off the screen and start over. God I miss terminate and stay resident on command line windows ;]
  2. Like
    Technicavolous got a reaction from lanefu in Do you recommend Espressobin?   
    I just recently broke out my Espressobin v5 and put the latest Armbian, and new uboot and script. Runs fine and my OMV appears so far to be quite stable.  I have a Marvell pcie 4 port sata card on it with a 4 port hotswappable 2.5 inch drive bay that is moving data fairly decently (80mb /s or so) between fairly slow machines with a low end gigabit router in between. Its booting from Sata - I used dd from an x86 linux box to burn the image directly to an inexpensive 128gb drive.
     
    I've always loved the Espressobin, nice little board and now Armbian has breathed new life into it - thanks Armbian and thanks for armbian-config!
  3. Like
    Technicavolous reacted to Igor in Amlogic forum adjustments   
    Added new feature - text ads. Can also be graphical ...
  4. Like
    Technicavolous reacted to sgjava in User Space IO is Python 3 and Java 8 bindings for user space GPIO, SPI, I2C, PWM and Serial interfaces   
    Edit: User Space IO depracated. Use Java Periphery instead https://github.com/sgjava/java-periphery
     
    https://github.com/sgjava/userspaceio
     
    After a lot of work and testing I have produced the User Space IO project! It provides Python 3 and Java 8 bindings for Linux user space GPIO, SPI, I2C, PWM and Serial interfaces. This allows cross SBC and cross language development using a common API. I took two best of breed C APIs for Linux user space libgpiod and c-periphery and produced CFFI bindings for Python and JNA bindings for Java. Since all the bindings closely match the C API it's easy to move from language to language. The side effect of using the Java library is that it should work with many different JVM based languages. How about creating your programs in Kotlin or Scala for instance?
     
    GPIO access uses the new gpiod interface and not the deprecated sysfs interface using libgpiod v1.1 (head from git repo). GPIO, SPI, I2C and serial interfaces expose all the low level functionality. I have added some helper methods for handling repetitive functions like building I2C messages, reading words from two registers, etc. You can of course go as low level as you need to. Please use Github to post any issues, pull requests, etc. I have tested Nano Pi Duo for 32 bit and NanoPi Neo +2 for 64 bit compatibility. I'll test more SBCs as I have time. Also, I have deleted https://github.com/sgjava/libgpiod-extra since User Space IO supersedes it.
     
    Based of some of the questions I had in the past please note the following:
    gpiod_ctxless_event_loop_multiple can handle GPIO interrupts Miscellaneous GPIO request flags GPIOD_LINE_REQUEST_FLAG_OPEN_DRAIN, GPIOD_LINE_REQUEST_FLAG_OPEN_SOURCE, GPIOD_LINE_REQUEST_FLAG_ACTIVE_LOW Non-root access using rc.local. Demo program using hardware PWM to flash LED:
     
  5. Like
    Technicavolous reacted to lanefu in Fail to fetch files   
    sudo systemctl status apt-cacher-ng sudo systemctl stop apt-cache-ng sudo rm -rf /var/cache/apt-cacher-ng/* sudo systemctl start apt-cacher-ng sudo systemctl status apt-cacher-ng  
  6. Like
    Technicavolous got a reaction from Jens Bauer in PROVE your power   
    As in this Armbian forum I am regularly diagnosing power issues. I've answered with this info on a few different posts over the years but I wanted this in one place so my students and the Armbian forum could discuss it.
     
    You will read over and over the importance of good power, both in the supply, the cables, and the connection. Anything that causes the voltage to drop below each boards threshold will cause problems that seem to have no explanation. The board may run and appear to be 'working' but operations that draw more power may fail and let the processor continue running. You might think a fully functional board has software failures. It's hair pulling, especially for those uneducated in power issues.
     
    Without attempting to teach a power class I've come up with some tools that can 'prove' weather the power supply and cables can deliver the power you expect. There's deep math and science to all of it, but what we really need is to be able to 'trust' our power. These tools can help us 'prove' our power is at least staying above the levels we expect.
     
    When there are so many variables in a situation we have to eliminate things to narrow down the problem. Since power is frequently the problem and fairly easy to prove, it's smart to start there. But how? We use our tools to test what we need to eliminate.
     
    We used to use banks of resistors and separate power and current meters to measure power draw and voltage drop, but these days there are inexpensive tools called DC Electronic Loads that do this for us. I've purchased numerous versions and models, and they've all been good at what they are designed for yet lacking in some other things. A trade off of quality for expense, but good enough really is good enough.
     
    Basically they have a transistor and a very low value resistor across the output and your power supply is pulsed with a PWM across that transistor. The width of the pulse determines the current draw on your power supply, effectively 'simulating' power draw from your device while displaying the voltage at the point of the load and the draw current. You simply attach your power supply and increase the load until the voltage drops below the supply's rating. If the voltage stays above its voltage rating at its rated current, it passes. If not, it fails. Almost as simple as that.
     
    I usually let the thing run for a while and check for heating, voltage drop over time and shutdown. Sometimes failure comes with heat.
     
    If you have a 5v power supply that's rated at 4 amps, and your load reports 4.9v at 4A draw, your supply has failed. 
     
    The image below shows a successful test of a popular power supply, the Meanwell RD65A., a dual voltage supply rated for 3A at 12v, and 6A at 5v.  As you can see in the photos the voltage stays above its rating at the rated current. This particular photo was taken after approximately 40 minutes running at full load, which is highly inadvisable for this kind of power supply. Usually one would never run over 80% load continuously, but hey, this was a burn test.  The only thing that failed here was the load, as the fan sensors on these particular models are somewhat flawed and overheat at less than their rating and shut down. Both the load and supply were run to their limits and we 'proved' this is a viable supply for our purposes.
     

     
    Here is an ebay search in the US that has similar inexpensive loads -
    https://www.ebay.com/sch/sis.html?_id=172461371107&_nkw=Constant+Current+Electronic+Load+9.99A+60W+1-30V+Battery+Capacity+Tester%23S
     
    and Amazon -
    https://www.amazon.com/s?k=DC+Electronic+Load+Tester&ref=nb_sb_noss
     
    They can be inexpensive and the fancy high power ones can be quite expensive ... find one that suits your needs.
     
    With another voltmeter you can check the drop in your cables. Set up the load to draw what you think is appropriate, note the voltage at the load. Then using the voltmeter measure the voltage at the power supply. Note the difference between the voltage at the supply and the voltage at the load. Viola, there's your drop. Is it good enough to run your board?
     
    Most 5v boards complain at 5v. They want above 5v, like 5.1.
     
    This is only a basic test, you can go a lot further but this will definitely prove your supply or fail it. If you really get into testing get some inline current measuring tools so you can see what your board is actually drawing. Most voltmeters have inline current meters and many are quite accurate and detailed. Watching the current draw on your board as you perform various operations can tell you if you have a hardware problem; if it draws more than the manufacturer specifies then there may well be a hardware issue.
     
    I hope this motivates someone to go farther with testing and proving their power.
     
     
    Board: Not on the list
  7. Like
    Technicavolous got a reaction from Werner in armbian orange pi one stuck   
    does your monitor have an 'auto adjust' ?I had a similar issue where the monitor was underscanning or overscanning or something and 'auto adjust' (from the monitors menu) brought the whole screen into the viewport of the monitor.
  8. Like
    Technicavolous got a reaction from gounthar in Compiling ffmpeg on the Orange Pi 4B   
    I am absolutely unqualified to give an answer here but out of curiosity I searched the error and found you may not have to specify an option to use neon?
     
    https://stackoverflow.com/questions/29851128/gcc-arm64-aarch64-unrecognized-command-line-option-mfpu-neon
  9. Like
    Technicavolous got a reaction from Werner in Orange Pi Zero does not start   
    Yes I should have thought of that ... but you'd be surprised at what comes in to my student labs!!
     
     
  10. Like
    Technicavolous got a reaction from Werner in RK3328 Kernel   
    I thought I had edited that out ... total 'oops' moment ...
  11. Like
    Technicavolous reacted to balbes150 in dist-upgrade?   
  12. Like
    Technicavolous got a reaction from gounthar in THE testing thread   
    Awesome thanks. Let me know what $$ you need. This looks right up my alley hihi I've been a bench tech all my (professional) life.
  13. Like
    Technicavolous got a reaction from Igor in Updated images for Odroid C4   
    I submitted an application on the maintainer page for the C4.
     
     
  14. Like
    Technicavolous got a reaction from Francesco Zuliani in Wrong power supply. Board does not start   
    You have wiped out your input voltage circuit. To be brutally sincere you've probably destroyed the board.
     
    That being said, take a look at the schematics -
    http://wiki.espressobin.net/tiki-index.php?page=Schematics
    select your model ...
     
    scroll down to page 14 and look at U9 - the regulator ... if all you did was wipe that out, you could replace it. You will need hot air soldering equipment and skills.
     
    HOWEVER, it's my experience that when over voltage is applied to a regulator, many times it fails by passing the power rather than blocking it. There is a good chance that 19 volts was applied to many 1.8 and 3.3 v circuits. In that case your board is toast.
     
    Mark it up to expensive education ... we've all done it. Most of us have plugged 12v into 5v boards that have no regulation. In that case the board is also toast.
  15. Like
    Technicavolous got a reaction from Igor in PROVE your power   
    As in this Armbian forum I am regularly diagnosing power issues. I've answered with this info on a few different posts over the years but I wanted this in one place so my students and the Armbian forum could discuss it.
     
    You will read over and over the importance of good power, both in the supply, the cables, and the connection. Anything that causes the voltage to drop below each boards threshold will cause problems that seem to have no explanation. The board may run and appear to be 'working' but operations that draw more power may fail and let the processor continue running. You might think a fully functional board has software failures. It's hair pulling, especially for those uneducated in power issues.
     
    Without attempting to teach a power class I've come up with some tools that can 'prove' weather the power supply and cables can deliver the power you expect. There's deep math and science to all of it, but what we really need is to be able to 'trust' our power. These tools can help us 'prove' our power is at least staying above the levels we expect.
     
    When there are so many variables in a situation we have to eliminate things to narrow down the problem. Since power is frequently the problem and fairly easy to prove, it's smart to start there. But how? We use our tools to test what we need to eliminate.
     
    We used to use banks of resistors and separate power and current meters to measure power draw and voltage drop, but these days there are inexpensive tools called DC Electronic Loads that do this for us. I've purchased numerous versions and models, and they've all been good at what they are designed for yet lacking in some other things. A trade off of quality for expense, but good enough really is good enough.
     
    Basically they have a transistor and a very low value resistor across the output and your power supply is pulsed with a PWM across that transistor. The width of the pulse determines the current draw on your power supply, effectively 'simulating' power draw from your device while displaying the voltage at the point of the load and the draw current. You simply attach your power supply and increase the load until the voltage drops below the supply's rating. If the voltage stays above its voltage rating at its rated current, it passes. If not, it fails. Almost as simple as that.
     
    I usually let the thing run for a while and check for heating, voltage drop over time and shutdown. Sometimes failure comes with heat.
     
    If you have a 5v power supply that's rated at 4 amps, and your load reports 4.9v at 4A draw, your supply has failed. 
     
    The image below shows a successful test of a popular power supply, the Meanwell RD65A., a dual voltage supply rated for 3A at 12v, and 6A at 5v.  As you can see in the photos the voltage stays above its rating at the rated current. This particular photo was taken after approximately 40 minutes running at full load, which is highly inadvisable for this kind of power supply. Usually one would never run over 80% load continuously, but hey, this was a burn test.  The only thing that failed here was the load, as the fan sensors on these particular models are somewhat flawed and overheat at less than their rating and shut down. Both the load and supply were run to their limits and we 'proved' this is a viable supply for our purposes.
     

     
    Here is an ebay search in the US that has similar inexpensive loads -
    https://www.ebay.com/sch/sis.html?_id=172461371107&_nkw=Constant+Current+Electronic+Load+9.99A+60W+1-30V+Battery+Capacity+Tester%23S
     
    and Amazon -
    https://www.amazon.com/s?k=DC+Electronic+Load+Tester&ref=nb_sb_noss
     
    They can be inexpensive and the fancy high power ones can be quite expensive ... find one that suits your needs.
     
    With another voltmeter you can check the drop in your cables. Set up the load to draw what you think is appropriate, note the voltage at the load. Then using the voltmeter measure the voltage at the power supply. Note the difference between the voltage at the supply and the voltage at the load. Viola, there's your drop. Is it good enough to run your board?
     
    Most 5v boards complain at 5v. They want above 5v, like 5.1.
     
    This is only a basic test, you can go a lot further but this will definitely prove your supply or fail it. If you really get into testing get some inline current measuring tools so you can see what your board is actually drawing. Most voltmeters have inline current meters and many are quite accurate and detailed. Watching the current draw on your board as you perform various operations can tell you if you have a hardware problem; if it draws more than the manufacturer specifies then there may well be a hardware issue.
     
    I hope this motivates someone to go farther with testing and proving their power.
     
     
    Board: Not on the list
  16. Like
    Technicavolous got a reaction from Werner in Wrong power supply. Board does not start   
    You have wiped out your input voltage circuit. To be brutally sincere you've probably destroyed the board.
     
    That being said, take a look at the schematics -
    http://wiki.espressobin.net/tiki-index.php?page=Schematics
    select your model ...
     
    scroll down to page 14 and look at U9 - the regulator ... if all you did was wipe that out, you could replace it. You will need hot air soldering equipment and skills.
     
    HOWEVER, it's my experience that when over voltage is applied to a regulator, many times it fails by passing the power rather than blocking it. There is a good chance that 19 volts was applied to many 1.8 and 3.3 v circuits. In that case your board is toast.
     
    Mark it up to expensive education ... we've all done it. Most of us have plugged 12v into 5v boards that have no regulation. In that case the board is also toast.
  17. Like
    Technicavolous got a reaction from Igor in Do you recommend ODROID-HC1 ?   
    I have several HC1s in service very long time running armbian with isp-config installed from armbian-config. (Thank you, Igor, armbian-config rocks!)  Very stable and performs excellently. We have one set up as NAS, I believe OMV. It works well but has little load so we never see any stress on it.
  18. Like
    Technicavolous got a reaction from Igor in mpcie 4g with sim   
    It works GREAT!
  19. Like
    Technicavolous got a reaction from TonyMac32 in mpcie 4g with sim   
    It works GREAT!
  20. Like
    Technicavolous got a reaction from lanefu in Armbian Certification   
    WHEN will I be able to take a course here, or series of courses here, and become a Certified Armbian Technician or Certified Armbian Engineer?
     
    May sound odd, but seriously consider the ramifications ...
  21. Like
    Technicavolous got a reaction from Igor in ODroid XU4 - DVD Drive/ISO9660 Issue   
    OK tonight I hooked up an old SH-S182 DVDR (+10 yrs) to a usb to ata adapter and had a little trouble reading any disk until I rebooted. When I rebooted with the DVD drive on and attached everything worked as I expected. I did NOT do any editing on /etc/fstab .
     
    I was able to read several burned DVD and CD s I had laying around. It even identified my K-Pax movie although I don't have anything installed with which to play it.
     
    Did you 'plug and try to play?' Perhaps turn the drive on first then boot the XU4 and see if anything id's? 
     
    It's nice having a disk drive available to bring things from old CDs and DVDs to USB, so thanks for the exercise! I hope you are able to get yours working, it's not a limitation of the XU4 or Armbian.
     
    technicavolous@odroidxu4:~$ uname -a
    Linux odroidxu4 4.9.61-odroidxu4 #2 SMP PREEMPT Wed Nov 22 16:34:23 CET 2017 armv7l armv7l armv7l GNU/Linux
     
     
  22. Like
    Technicavolous reacted to gewoonmaarten in Clearfog Pro: How to use switched 6 port ethernet?   
    SOLVED. I got the ethernet ports running using the dev branch of Armbian for the Clearfog then I bridged all the lan port to br0. Then I installed a dhcp server listing to br0. For more detail visit http://superuser.com/questions/1120714/how-make-a-switch-in-linux
    where its explained very clearly.
  23. Like
    Technicavolous reacted to Heisath in SOLVED - Clearfog Pro PCI-e card only detected in slot 2 in Armbian   
    Excuse this double post / push.
     
    But I think I found your problem Techni and a simple solution.
     
    I built a new armbian image using newest kernel and debian and made sure to check the ath10k pci driver option.
     
    Then burned it to my sd card and booted my clearfog -> voila same error as yours in dmesg. And no firmware files in /lib/firmware/ath10k!
     
    A simple apt install firmware-atheros got me the firmware and after a reboot the card is detected and available in ifconfig.
     
    So just try it using lan and install the atheros firmware.
     
    I will also provide my testimage (login: root and 1234) in case you have no network connectivity.
    (Upload will take some time, will update this with link when its done...)
    EDIT: couldnt get a running image resized from my 64GB SD Card in time. Will try again if you need it...
     
    Greetings,
    count-doku
     
  24. Like
    Technicavolous reacted to Heisath in Clearfog Pro 4.14.14 Network Manager fails   
    You don't need additional packages (except ifupdown) for a manual network configuration.
     
    Just edit /etc/network/interfaces, you can check here for reference https://wiki.debian.org/NetworkConfiguration
    Or have a look at my config attached to this post.
     
    Greets,
    count-doku
     
     
    # Bring up automatically: auto lo auto eth0 auto eth1 lan1 lan2 lan3 lan4 lan5 lan6 br0 # Configure loopback interface iface lo inet loopback # Configure eth0, my outgoing public interface allow-hotplug eth0 iface eth0 inet dhcp post-up iptables-restore < /etc/iptables.up.rules post-up ip6tables-restore < /etc/ip6tables.up.rules # Bring up eth1 manual w/o ip config. This is neccessary to communicate with the switch / dsa iface eth1 inet manual # address 169.254.100.100 # netmask 255.255.255.255 # Do with the SFP Port whatever you want iface eth2 inet manual # Set all switched lan ports to manual iface lan1 inet manual iface lan2 inet manual iface lan3 inet manual iface lan4 inet manual iface lan5 inet manual iface lan6 inet manual # Create bridge over all lanports and ip config them iface br0 inet static bridge_ports lan1 lan2 lan3 lan4 lan5 lan6 address 192.168.1.1 netmask 255.255.255.0 network 192.168.1.0 broadcast 192.168.1.255  
  25. Like
    Technicavolous reacted to zador.blood.stained in Clearfog Pro 4.14.14 Network Manager fails   
    According to my tests this will be fixed in 4.16. Or it can be fixed right now by removing NM and using a different way for configuring networking (ifupdown, systemd-networkd)
     
    Edit: Though I don't have the Pro model so not sure if DSA will still be an issue with NM.