chwe

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  1. Like
    chwe got a reaction from pask in (Serial) console access via 'USB-UART/Gadget mode' on Linux/Windows/OSX   
    Access to a console can be mandatory when you SBC doesn't work as expected (e.g Network or HDMI output doesn't work). When SSH/Display access isn't possible access to console via UART is the best way to get a clue where your SBC hangs. This short tutorial should give you an introduction how this works. For some boards, armbian implements an USB gadget mode (a 'fake' serial console over microUSB) describen below. As a reminder an USB-UART bridge is always prefered over USB gadget mode whenever possible (UART get's initialized before the gadget driver and also before HDMI, means even if you don't get a proper output from HDMI or gadget mode console, it is possible that UART will give you the needed information).
     
    Prerequisites:
    We need an Terminal program to access the console. If you use Linux on your host system I prefer picocom (something like minicom will also do the job) which can be installed:
    on debian a like systems:
    sudo apt-get install picocom from arch community repo:
    https://www.archlinux.org/packages/community/x86_64/picocom/
     
    on fedora systems:
    yum install picocom on Mac OS X:
    brew install picocom on Widows we use PuTTY:
     
    https://www.chiark.greenend.org.uk/~sgtatham/putty/latest.html
     
    UART USB Adapter:
    There are various USB-UART bridges e.g FT232 (and fakes of them, cause FDTI is expensive ), CH340/1,PL2303 or CP2102
    Normally it doesn't matter which one you use. I prefer the (probably fake) FDTI on the right side, but the CH341 does also a good job:

    The only thing which is needed is that the signal-level matches with your SBCs needs (this is mostly 3.3V expect some Odroids e.g HC1 which has only 1.8V!).  Most of these USB-UART bridges have jumpers for 5V and 3.3V, make sure that you use the 3.3V.  
    You've to figure out which pins on your SBC are debug UART (they've mostly a own 3 pin header, sometimes it's on the large pin header e.g. Tinkerboard) and then connect:
    GND --> GND RX --> TX TX --> RX You've to check dmesg (linux) or run devmgmt.msc (windows) to know which device you use. 
    Linux:
    [256597.311207] usb 3-2: Product: USB2.0-Serial [256597.402283] usbcore: registered new interface driver ch341 [256597.402341] usbserial: USB Serial support registered for ch341-uart [256597.402392] ch341 3-2:1.0: ch341-uart converter detected [256597.404012] usb 3-2: ch341-uart converter now attached to ttyUSB0 --> Device will be /dev/ttyUSB0
    Windows:
    for windows 10 (https://www.google.ch/search?client=opera&q=find+arduino+port+windows+10&sourceid=opera&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8)
    Something like the picture in USB Gadget Mode part of the tutorial should show up)
     
    Armbians default settings are (expect some RK devices):
    For Picocom:
    picocom -b 115200 -r -l /dev/ttyUSB0 and for some RK devices:
    picocom -b 1500000 -r -l /dev/ttyUSB0 For PuTTY:
    You've to set configuration in 'Serial'. COM11 is just an example and needs to be checked first, Speed (baud) needs to be changed when you deal with the few RK boards which need 1500000.

     
    OS X:
    TBD
    should be similar to Linux whereas the naming differs a bit. See: https://forum.odroid.com/viewtopic.php?f=53&t=841 as an example with minicom.
     
    Normally you connect the USB-UART bridge to your host computer (and the SBC) and start picocom/putty before you power the board to ensure you get the full bootlog and not only parts of it. 
     
    USB Gadget Mode
    Several board (see list) for which official armbian images exist (or csc images can be built) have no HDMI display. On those boards there's USB gadget mode driver activated so that you can have console access to them via USB connection. The following short tutorial describes how you can access to console from Linux (don't have a windows machine here at the moment, I may check it later):
     
    install picocom connect your board via USB to your host computer (it should be one which is able to power an SBC via its USB port) check dmesg for the device showing up:  [184372.603816] usb 3-2: Product: Gadget Serial v2.4 [184372.603818] usb 3-2: Manufacturer: Linux 4.14.65-sunxi with musb-hdrc [184372.660041] cdc_acm 3-2:2.0: ttyACM0: USB ACM device [184372.660402] usbcore: registered new interface driver cdc_acm [184372.660403] cdc_acm: USB Abstract Control Model driver for USB modems and ISDN adapters  
    connect to it via picocom (in this case 'picocom /dev/ttyACM0'):  chwe@chwe-acer:~$ picocom /dev/ttyACM0 picocom v2.2 port is : /dev/ttyACM0 flowcontrol : none baudrate is : 9600 parity is : none databits are : 8 stopbits are : 1 escape is : C-a local echo is : no noinit is : no noreset is : no nolock is : no send_cmd is : sz -vv receive_cmd is : rz -vv -E imap is : omap is : emap is : crcrlf,delbs, Type [C-a] [C-h] to see available commands Terminal ready Debian GNU/Linux 9 orangepizero ttyGS0 orangepizero login: root Password: You are required to change your password immediately (root enforced) Changing password for root. (current) UNIX password:  
    I assume if you use the same settings in something like putty on windows and you check which 'serial' device shows up in *where windows shows connected devices - I forgot it* you should be able to access it from windows (someone motivated may confirm this).  
    For Windows:
    run devmgmt.msc and search for the serial device (in this case COM3) and connect to it via PuTTY (thanks to @hjc):

    for windows 10 (https://www.google.ch/search?client=opera&q=find+arduino+port+windows+10&sourceid=opera&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8):
    (even the tutorial is for arduinos, it should be similar for every 'COM device')
     
    Currently boards with USB gadget mode:
    bananapim2plus bananapim2zero nanopifire3 nanopim3 nanopineo2 nanopineocore2 nanopineoplus2 orangepizeroplus nanopiair nanopiduo nanopineo olimex-som204-a20 orangepilite orangepi-r1 orangepizero orangepizeroplus2-h3 orangepizeroplus2-h5 tritium-h3  
    The silly approach
    For those, who want to save 1$ for an USB-UART bridge, you can spend 10$ for an OrangePi Zero and use its spare UARTs to log into an other SBC...  SSH --> opi, ttl --> Tinkerboard
    For those loving text more than videos:
    SSH to your SBC sudo armbian-config --> system --> hardware  to activate an spare UART (in this case it was UART2, will give you ttyS2) reboot picocom -b 115200 -r -l /dev/ttyS2  
     

    See:  https://asciinema.org/a/B87EOGhc0gx9oikMAGEG94lXR

     
     
  2. Like
    chwe got a reaction from Werner in Why are armbian images not in a format that Etcher understands?   
    happily we're not a vendor right. would it be nice to have the hashes published somewhere.. of course it would.. it would also be nice to have a unified bootloader on arm which doesn't suck give me headache every time I look at it. or wifi which just works or device tree which actually describes the devices properly and not copy paste gone or boardmaker cares about mainlining their products etc.
     
    If you don't trust our images you can still build them yourself. Then you just have to trust that we didn't hide something in the x lines of code to create an image (have fun to review that ).
     
    it would also be nice if someone rewrites nand-sata-install.. My attempts so far just made it worse..
     
     
    well 42.zip is still a thing? https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zip_bomb
     
    well we had fun to send each other shutdown commands over network in school when I was young (nothing was more insecure than our schools network back then - that's why no teacher trusted it and never had exams on the school computer )..
     
  3. Like
    chwe reacted to piter75 in armbian can not boot in Rock Pi4 v1.4   
    I have been happily booting Rock Pi 4B v1.4 since August with both eMMC and SD.
    As others already pointed it would be good if you had some console logs.
     
    At this point I am running custom Armbian build based on latest u-boot and open source ATF but will burn SD with latest "official" image, check if it boots and will get back with the results.
  4. Like
    chwe got a reaction from Igor in Is it Possible To Use Armbian On Pi Devices?   
    there are some ugly hacks needed to "build armbian" for the RPi... I know it cause I did it (and honestly this ugly hack will never see daylight - I don't wanna add mess to the buildscript, I don't want to maintain a RPi kernel family and I've no intention to deal with the people it would attract, IMO those beneficial to armbian could easy do the hacks to build "armbian for raspberries").. On the RPi forum the Jamesh (forum mod and RPT employee) made clear that they don't plan to make their bootblobs ext4 capable.. According to him, he talked to one of their engineers and he thought it's a dumb idea. The rest of the guys thought that vfat is for whatever reason the best thing you can have...
     
    Thomas did never adjust the buildscript to "build for raspberries". He glued a recent rootfs from armbian together with the kernel from the RPi repository and some adjustments here and there to get it the way he wants it (e.g. slow down "GbE" cause this USB2 GbE messed up, and an adjusted firstrun script to update kernel from their repository etc.). Cause Thomas no longer maintains OMV on arm, I don't think the new images will be based on armbian rootfs. The needed "glue repository" is removed from his github and I'm not sure someone forked it in time (he announced that he'll remove it). As far as I understand OMV has currently no ARM maintainer anymore.. So as soon as the support for the current version ends, it's gonna be interesting who will do the needed adjustments to build OMV in the future. It seems that their devs are either minor interested in ARM or (as we all do) lack of enough spare time to keep it rolling on ARM.
     
    Back to topic..
     
    Even if it happens such a PR has to be properly reviewed.. The only "proper" way I see would be bootblob chainloads u-boot u-boot fires up kernel but even then.. It will be mess. You need fat otherwise it's not gonna working.. You fully rely on their development speed for everything that matters (cause a bunch of stuff happens in the bootblob). Whenever they change something here and there the fallout is only visible once the our "customers" will show up and complain about *random behavior* (e.g. the thermal issues for the 3b+ were solved by lowering the throttling start to something like 65°C - announced in one git commit but neither in the changelog, cause changelog is according to jamesh for raspbian as OS not for the underlying stuff like bootblob ). Have fun to explain the Armbian users why *random stuff* behaves different from update to update (not that we can explain this for all the boards we support yet - but adding another family which needs a special treatment in this case might be annoying).
     
    Currently we have one boardfamily which has only CSC supported targets (mt7623). The reason it exists is me had fun to bring up a new boardfamily and the maintenance is minor ("pure" upstream kernel, and a ugly hacked upstream u-boot which "just works"). I don't do much on it (test images from time to time - btw. I should do it soon-ish cause Igor bumped u-boot ). The board hasn't many "fans" so only a few people will show up from time to time which is IMO manageable. The RPi for sure would attract more people, so even as csc target at least one of the "part time maintainers" would be needed to deal with it (if someone shows up only for the PR for initial support with no intention to maintain it it would be a clear "thanks, but NO thanks" from my side, even explaining that csc doesn't mean "official support" all the time would be too much wasted time). Other issues such as 32bit 64bit, we don't do 32bit userland on 64bit hardware, as well as 64bit kernels with 32bit userland (thomas suggested it once for low memory boards for which it might be beneficial) and 64bit/64bit for the raspberry is kind of a pain (I had it for the 4b, cause I only have the 1GB ram version most of the issues didn't even hit me, e.g. in the beginnings only 3GB could be used followed by USB3 (iirc for USB attached storage) having issues later on when 4GB ram should actually work) and the videocore stuff still generates fallout on 64bit/64bit systems (I was never interested in the VC capabilities so my 64bit "artwork" worked ok-ish).
     
    So as long as we don't see a talented allrounder (dealing with buildscript adjustments, kernel fixes and annoying bootloader crap) showing up and maintaining it, I'm not in favor to add broadcom SoCs to our buildscript, even as csc targets. Just do it is IMO not enough. The 26 million raspberry users (or was it 30? the number changes always when jamesh explains that their users are happy with what they get and how dare you are that you claim that something might be not perfect with their product) might be upset if something doesn't work as it works on raspbian. [can contain a bit of sarcasm.. ]
  5. Like
    chwe reacted to gprovost in Helios64 Annoucement   
    Yeah I should have mentioned that also. Through the same USB Type-C we also support Flash over USB with the rockchip dev/flash tools available. The recovery button is on one of 3 push button on the board. Each on-board memory (SPI and eMMC) can be disabled with a proper jumper ( No need to have 16 fingers to flash the board ).
     
    We will try our best. Also we will sell a simple adapter kit in order for people to use Helios64 with any mini-ITX and ATX PSU. This way people could recycle their old case and save money.
  6. Like
    chwe reacted to gprovost in Helios64 Annoucement   
    We will offer an ECC option. The Rockchip RK3399 SoC itself doesn't have a memory controller that has ECC feature, however we are currently working with a SDRAM vendor that now offer built-in ECC feature inside the SDRAM directly. It's not impossible it will be available on day one.
     
     
     
    No. It is not a use case that make sense from our point of view. I don't believe there will be a lot of people out there with a USB Type-C power adapter that can delivered up to 100W. Plus the power circuitry (and the PSU) would be quite expensive.
     
     
    No. It's a pure M.2 SATA port. FYI it's share with the SATA port 1, so the combination is either ( 1x M.2 SSD + 4x HDD/SSD ) or 5x HDD/SSD.
     
     
    Yes there is a 128Mb SPI NOR Flash.
     
     
    Something we didn't disclose because too much info already on the picture, the USB Type-C has been designed with a 4-in-1 mode concept :
    - Display Port
    - DAS mode
    - Host mode
    - Serial Console Access
    We will explain more at a later stage... but it's quite a unique design we did.
     
     
    We wanted to make the eMMC a basic feature of our board. I mean what's the point to sell it as a module when you know that in 90% of the case your user should use eMMC instead of SDcard. It also help in term of software support to know that all user Helios64 user will have the same config, therefore we can focus on installation guide that use the eMMC.
     
     
     
    You guess right this is not just some bare bone carrier board with a SoC in the middle. Between the PCIe-to-SATA bridge, the 2.5Gbe interface, the built-in UPS feature, RAM, eMMC, etc... it adds-up quickly. We also paid a lot of attention on the different power rails, this is a premium design compare to all the RK3399 board out there.
    Helios4 was USD200 with the full kit (PSU, case, cable, fan, etc...), our goal it to try to be in the same ballpark. This time we will sell a-la-carte style, you can just buy the board alone, our with the case, if you already have a PSU then no need to order one...
     
  7. Like
    chwe reacted to gprovost in Helios64 Annoucement   
    Hi guys,
     
    I guess some might have heard that we (Kobol Team) were spinning a new project to succeed to Helios4. Here it is... Helios64
     

     
     
    We didn't have to look too far for the board name since in essence the goal was to redesign from scratch Helios4 with a 64-bit SoC and try to improve every key features that made Helios4 a very targeted board for NAS setup.
     
    Right now we are at the prototyping test phase, hopefully in a 2 month time will have dozen of Eval boards to send around for evaluation and review... and if all goes well first batch should be available for order in Feb / March 2020.
     
    Happy to answer any question :-)
     
  8. Like
    chwe got a reaction from NicoD in NanoPi M4 V2 - M4 Image not working   
    not Igor but I can help here..
     
    https://github.com/armbian/build/blob/259a0bf5fe3bc9a20709597e43f18421aa3ae4ed/config/sources/rockchip64.conf#L8-L9
     
    The Rockpi uses ayufans u-boot which is not upstream (it's based on rockchips u-boot). The former nanopis are supported by upstream u-boot (DDR3 or normal DDR4 should be supported for RK3399 iirc). There were a few attempts so that upstream u-boot can handle lpddr4 but the last I heard is that it's not stable yet (someone from the forum was involved but I don't remember the name.. ).
     
    Patch in the defconfig and the DT into ayufans u-boot should be an easy task (I'm confident that friendlyarms is based on the same one.. so not much to patch around).
     
    unfortunate I would happily dive in (if there's still a spare one)..
  9. Like
    chwe got a reaction from TonyMac32 in Daily (tech related) news diet   
    https://github.com/buildo/react-components/pull/1367
     
    Conclusion: we definitively need a nemobot as well here...
  10. Like
    chwe got a reaction from JMCC in Request for new Video about current state of Armbian project   
    Freshly from the not official Armbian studios:
     
    Armbian
    the last 2 years
     
    I would assume that even on a conference those topics wouldn't be presented:
    it's a special use case, and the question comes up on a weekly to monthly repetition pattern.
    that's simply user-side stuff, mostly unrelated to armbian as a project, but as a NAS example, OMV is quite common under armbian users cause the ARM maintainer of OMV is @tkaiser.
     
    that's what changelogs are for.
     
    I assume the major reason the video is on the page is not that we have a video but because it's a side-product of the conference. So chances to get a new video are rather low, except there would be a new talk about the project in another conference. And for such a talk I would propose other topics, like how to engage people to contribute or how to deal with different opinions etc.
     
    But luckily for you, most of your questions can be answered with the search engine. and with text to speech it might feel like a video.
  11. Like
    chwe got a reaction from Igor in Request for new Video about current state of Armbian project   
    Freshly from the not official Armbian studios:
     
    Armbian
    the last 2 years
     
    I would assume that even on a conference those topics wouldn't be presented:
    it's a special use case, and the question comes up on a weekly to monthly repetition pattern.
    that's simply user-side stuff, mostly unrelated to armbian as a project, but as a NAS example, OMV is quite common under armbian users cause the ARM maintainer of OMV is @tkaiser.
     
    that's what changelogs are for.
     
    I assume the major reason the video is on the page is not that we have a video but because it's a side-product of the conference. So chances to get a new video are rather low, except there would be a new talk about the project in another conference. And for such a talk I would propose other topics, like how to engage people to contribute or how to deal with different opinions etc.
     
    But luckily for you, most of your questions can be answered with the search engine. and with text to speech it might feel like a video.
  12. Like
    chwe got a reaction from NicoD in Request for new Video about current state of Armbian project   
    Freshly from the not official Armbian studios:
     
    Armbian
    the last 2 years
     
    I would assume that even on a conference those topics wouldn't be presented:
    it's a special use case, and the question comes up on a weekly to monthly repetition pattern.
    that's simply user-side stuff, mostly unrelated to armbian as a project, but as a NAS example, OMV is quite common under armbian users cause the ARM maintainer of OMV is @tkaiser.
     
    that's what changelogs are for.
     
    I assume the major reason the video is on the page is not that we have a video but because it's a side-product of the conference. So chances to get a new video are rather low, except there would be a new talk about the project in another conference. And for such a talk I would propose other topics, like how to engage people to contribute or how to deal with different opinions etc.
     
    But luckily for you, most of your questions can be answered with the search engine. and with text to speech it might feel like a video.
  13. Like
    chwe got a reaction from Igor in Armbian for Banana Pi Zero H2+   
    with the green + in the  right upper corner you can follow a thread without even writing in it.
     
     
    just out of curiosity.. what use-case do you have for the board?
     
     
  14. Like
    chwe got a reaction from Igor in CSI camera support rockchip SBC   
    https://github.com/armbian/build/pull/1482
     
    Far away from 'supported but basically the camera can work without loosing dt overlays. For the userspace part, once this one get merged you're on your own.. I can't provide more help than that. From a kernelside the cameras work both without crashes, they're patched to match the asus repo and you can switch between both.. Get the right commands and everything else sorted out to make them useful in userspace is a different story, and that's definitively not my story. I already spent too much time for this. 
     
     
    turned out that a small commit in 2018 made the trick and a bunch of crappy patching.
     
     
  15. Like
    chwe got a reaction from lanefu in Is ROCK960 support planned ?   
    well that was back in the days where we were really excited about every rk3399 sbc and immediately supported them cause cool devices.. The board starts at ~70$ (1gb) up to 100$ (4gb) which is okay.. I like that they sell expansion boards for the m.2 slot. the fact that the board has no ethernet without adding a carrier (and I didn't check if a carrier with ethernet exists) is a bummer.. This might be an interesting sort of SOM for small series high price devices but not a casual SBC for the average user here.
     
    But nevertheless, I hope the few hints for @Hijax may help him to integrate csc support for it. As long as he can provide a sane integration of the board into the buildsystem, I don't see a reason to reject such a PR. Obviously it's then up to him and other contributors to keep those patches alive. Otherwise csc support doesn't live long for it.
     
    Reminds me to the idea of having a staging like structure (https://lwn.net/Articles/324279/) in our buildsystem for csc, eol targets so that we can sort out related patches easily in case they break supported boards. But well, that's one for a different thread.. 
  16. Like
    chwe reacted to JMCC in RK3328 Media Script (Rock64, Renegade)   
    Hello. Sorry, I've been out for a while.
    Have you tried to play the videos with the Gstreamer GUI player? (the launcher labeled as "Rockchip Gst Player") And with MPV-GBM? Please try, and see if you experience the same video delay.
     
  17. Like
    chwe got a reaction from Igor in [Proposal] What about boards popularity chart using both poll and telemetry?   
    as simple as it is... with opt-in nobody will opt for it.. cause honestly people don't change stuff on their os without a benefit and I don't like the dickmove where people have to opt-out for tracking, all sort of device tracking should always be opt-in. We have a estimated 'boardpopularty' statistic with https://dl.armbian.com/_download-stats/ and that is IMO more than enough to get an idea how popular a board is (and honestly, I would overthink my contribution to the project if we start to add such a feature to the project). Contribution to Armbian is mostly driven by personal interest and availability of the board. If we would start to base contribution on popularity of the board by users, we would have to support boards like the RPi cause on a user side they are really popular, on a devs side.... not that much.
    Boards like a clearfog will never be as popular as a orangePi, simply cause it's too expensive for the average going cheap user which buys an ARM board. It simply targets a different user base. People buying a clearfog mostly do their homework first before they buy a board cause they more or less know what they need. People who buy the OPi Zero can also be driven by, what can go wrong if I buy a SBC which costs 15$ (just an example, there are tons of other cheap boards as well.. ). For a bunch of use cases, the OPi Zero will be a perfect solution and it's overall not a bad board (as long as you don't rely on it's wifi ) but the higher popularity compared to the solid run doesn't mean that it's the better board. It's a different board targeting a different user base and as long as we have contributors which are willing to support both we should support both.
     
    I don't see a reason to mark it as important.
     
    nice for what? What information will we gain? What's the benefit for the project? I don't see it.
  18. Like
    chwe reacted to martinayotte in THE testing thread   
    Me ...
  19. Like
    chwe got a reaction from NicoD in List of Stuff   
    no idea, and I won't test it.. I don't even own a HDMI display anymore.. Don't have a TV.. my buildserver is mostly headless or with DVI display for maintenance when SSH isn't possible.. Don't own a DVD player or so to feed it.. Really,, I don't care much about HDMI in at the moment..
  20. Like
    chwe got a reaction from Werner in List of Stuff   
    you guys have to many SBCs...
     
    They dropped cause they no longer wanted to use armbian as a base for their images iirc..
     
     
    Hmm the boards I remember I have..
     
    Beagle bone the white one
    beagle board xM or so, they were from the pre RPi time, I never did much with it..
    opi zero, opi pc+, opi 2g-iot, opi 4g-iot, OPi 3 and OPi with H6 but no USB3 don't even remember the name..
    BPi m2 zero, BPI R2, BPi W2
    RPi 1b (one of the first in switzerland probably...) RPi 2b, somewhere there should be a 3b, and yes I bought a 4b
    RockPi 4b, somewhere there's a RK3399 TV box which I never hacked fully..
    a Olimex Lime 2 (this board looks just like made by people who know what they're doing I would love to see some new boards from them.. )
    and finally a Lichee Pi Zero which runs Debian stretch on a 64mb ram board without issues.. (okay.. I never gave it much workload.. but iirc there was once a python script with logging stuff running on it).. 
     
    okay.. I might have also too many SBCs..
    ahh.. and a Tinkerboard.. they were dirt cheap here back then.. now 2 years later they're doubled the price they had in the beginnings..
     
    The most used one is still the OPi Zero.. it was cheap back then.. and for most of my work sufficient.. The RockPi crushed numbers for 14 days in a row sitting at 75-80°C without issues, I was actually surprised.. cause it was one of the self crafted early images for this board.. The tinker was fun to mess with.. but I never cared about desktop.. so actually this board didn't make much sense for me.. The BPi R2 was a rabbit hole to mess with u-boot, but I learned a lot (network is still crippled).. The W2, I don't know.. it's a strange thingie.. People here do crazy thing to hack TV boxes with the same SoC (actually a cool thread cause not much bloating, so please don't mess there ..).
     
    completely forgot.. there's a HC1 as well,, but this serves as a NAS box I don't mess with, I just does what I expect from a NAS box..
  21. Like
    chwe got a reaction from NicoD in List of Stuff   
    you guys have to many SBCs...
     
    They dropped cause they no longer wanted to use armbian as a base for their images iirc..
     
     
    Hmm the boards I remember I have..
     
    Beagle bone the white one
    beagle board xM or so, they were from the pre RPi time, I never did much with it..
    opi zero, opi pc+, opi 2g-iot, opi 4g-iot, OPi 3 and OPi with H6 but no USB3 don't even remember the name..
    BPi m2 zero, BPI R2, BPi W2
    RPi 1b (one of the first in switzerland probably...) RPi 2b, somewhere there should be a 3b, and yes I bought a 4b
    RockPi 4b, somewhere there's a RK3399 TV box which I never hacked fully..
    a Olimex Lime 2 (this board looks just like made by people who know what they're doing I would love to see some new boards from them.. )
    and finally a Lichee Pi Zero which runs Debian stretch on a 64mb ram board without issues.. (okay.. I never gave it much workload.. but iirc there was once a python script with logging stuff running on it).. 
     
    okay.. I might have also too many SBCs..
    ahh.. and a Tinkerboard.. they were dirt cheap here back then.. now 2 years later they're doubled the price they had in the beginnings..
     
    The most used one is still the OPi Zero.. it was cheap back then.. and for most of my work sufficient.. The RockPi crushed numbers for 14 days in a row sitting at 75-80°C without issues, I was actually surprised.. cause it was one of the self crafted early images for this board.. The tinker was fun to mess with.. but I never cared about desktop.. so actually this board didn't make much sense for me.. The BPi R2 was a rabbit hole to mess with u-boot, but I learned a lot (network is still crippled).. The W2, I don't know.. it's a strange thingie.. People here do crazy thing to hack TV boxes with the same SoC (actually a cool thread cause not much bloating, so please don't mess there ..).
     
    completely forgot.. there's a HC1 as well,, but this serves as a NAS box I don't mess with, I just does what I expect from a NAS box..
  22. Like
    chwe got a reaction from lanefu in List of Stuff   
    you guys have to many SBCs...
     
    They dropped cause they no longer wanted to use armbian as a base for their images iirc..
     
     
    Hmm the boards I remember I have..
     
    Beagle bone the white one
    beagle board xM or so, they were from the pre RPi time, I never did much with it..
    opi zero, opi pc+, opi 2g-iot, opi 4g-iot, OPi 3 and OPi with H6 but no USB3 don't even remember the name..
    BPi m2 zero, BPI R2, BPi W2
    RPi 1b (one of the first in switzerland probably...) RPi 2b, somewhere there should be a 3b, and yes I bought a 4b
    RockPi 4b, somewhere there's a RK3399 TV box which I never hacked fully..
    a Olimex Lime 2 (this board looks just like made by people who know what they're doing I would love to see some new boards from them.. )
    and finally a Lichee Pi Zero which runs Debian stretch on a 64mb ram board without issues.. (okay.. I never gave it much workload.. but iirc there was once a python script with logging stuff running on it).. 
     
    okay.. I might have also too many SBCs..
    ahh.. and a Tinkerboard.. they were dirt cheap here back then.. now 2 years later they're doubled the price they had in the beginnings..
     
    The most used one is still the OPi Zero.. it was cheap back then.. and for most of my work sufficient.. The RockPi crushed numbers for 14 days in a row sitting at 75-80°C without issues, I was actually surprised.. cause it was one of the self crafted early images for this board.. The tinker was fun to mess with.. but I never cared about desktop.. so actually this board didn't make much sense for me.. The BPi R2 was a rabbit hole to mess with u-boot, but I learned a lot (network is still crippled).. The W2, I don't know.. it's a strange thingie.. People here do crazy thing to hack TV boxes with the same SoC (actually a cool thread cause not much bloating, so please don't mess there ..).
     
    completely forgot.. there's a HC1 as well,, but this serves as a NAS box I don't mess with, I just does what I expect from a NAS box..
  23. Like
    chwe reacted to 5kft in armbianmonitor cpu-temperature broken? -ge: unary operator expected   
    Hi @Igor, @guidol - in case it is helpful, I took a quick look at this and the fix is pretty straightforward.  Essentially all that needs to be done is to remove the existing "patch/kernel/sunxi-dev/ths-29-sun4i-gpadc-iio-add-h5-thermal-zone.patch" for 5.1, and to port over the 4.19 "patch/kernel/sunxi-next/ths-29-add-correct-h5-thermal-zone.patch" to 5.1 (i.e., bring into "patch/kernel/sunxi-dev/").  The problem is the currently the thermal-zone is defined in the wrong DT location, and the zone definition and tips  and cooling maps are incorrect/incomplete for the 5.1 version.
     
    I did a quick test of fixing it this way and the result works:
    root@nanopineo2:~# cat /proc/version Linux version 5.1.15-sunxi64 (root@elrond) (gcc version 7.4.1 20181213 [linaro-7.4-2019.02 revision 56ec6f6b99cc167ff0c2f8e1a2eed33b1edc85d4] (Linaro GCC 7.4-2019.02)) #5.90.190705 SMP Thu Jul 4 14:05:17 UTC 2019 root@nanopineo2:~# cat /sys/class/thermal/thermal_zone0/temp 40936 root@nanopineo2:~# I'd fix this and submit the change myself, but unfortunately I don't have time to be thorough about testing it right now (e.g., verify on some H3 boards and other H5 boards as well), and likely won't be able to until next week...I'm happy to do this then if you don't have time to look into this.
  24. Like
    chwe got a reaction from Jens Bauer in Raspberry Pi 4 Released - From $35 USD   
    FYI:
     
    asked about ext4 support for boot to get rid off the FAT partition:
    https://www.raspberrypi.org/forums/viewtopic.php?f=63&t=243890&p=1487617#p1487617
    seems not of importance for them..
     
    some charger issues:
    https://www.raspberrypi.org/forums/viewtopic.php?f=63&t=244146
    and a nice link provided there:
    https://www.scorpia.co.uk/2019/06/28/pi4-not-working-with-some-chargers-or-why-you-need-two-cc-resistors/
    as with more or less every boardmaker, things are not mature in the beginnings.. But at least some of the flaws will likely be fixed over time..
     
     
     
  25. Like
    chwe got a reaction from Igor in Raspberry Pi 4 Released - From $35 USD   
    https://www.raspberrypi.org/forums/viewtopic.php?f=63&t=244166

     
    if you ever look for a textbook example of whataboutism.. There you go. We need some more HackRF boards to target all those CRT displays in the wild..